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Canon eos 2000d options and help please


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Posted (edited)

Hi guys I bought a cannon eos 2000d with a 18-55mm lense

i would like to use this on an 8” orion xt plus so will need a t ring but not sure about the focal length Barlow etc required

also could this camera be used with lenses for n its own for deep space/ nebular photogtaphy and lunar?

I have a 102 mark and zwo 224 for planetary but am a complete newbie to the dslr world and the zwo can’t scale down to capture all the moon, though I did buy a reducer lense to try

i would be buying the adaptor/barlow of Amazon as I only have a shorty 2x barlow

 

thanks

 

 

 

IMG_3615.jpeg

Edited by LunarRob
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49 minutes ago, LunarRob said:

i would like to use this on an 8” orion xt plus so will need a t ring but not sure about the focal length Barlow etc required

also could this camera be used with lenses for n its own for deep space/ nebular photogtaphy and lunar?

Some confusion on this issue. First you must get a DSLR adapter for Canon EOS. They are also called 'DSLR-M48 Ring Adapter', as it says, it has M48 inner threads. Then you need a barrel with the same outer threads that screws on to the adapter, and fits in the 2" eyepiece holder. Different solutions on this. Some use a loose barrel that is fixated with grub screws. The point is that the barrel should be fixated like an ordinairy eyepiece on the telescope, in this way you can rotate it freely. Barlow? With this camera and an 8" newtonian you barely fit the whole moon in the image. With a barlow you will only fit a fourth of it. Field-of-view. You might need a barlow to get focus, but this is easily remedied by lifting up the primary mirror a few millimeters. Plenty of guides on this operation. Makes the whole combo more versatile. The problem is that you don't get enaugh inward travel on the focus tube, you screw it all the way in and still don't get focus. This is caused by the way a DSLR is condtructed, the distance from the lens fittings to the sensor is longer than on an eyepiece or dedicated astro camera. Maybe your Orion get focus without, don't worry untill you have tried.

This Canon is capable of deep sky imaging, but not with a plain dobsonian. You will at least need a star-tracker that follows the earth's rotation. The focal lenght and quality of the lens  (together with your skills) will determine how good images you can expect. Once you have the tracker, consider a ST80, 'Short Tube 80mm'. Very cheap, 400mm focal lenght and sold under many brands. The Sky-Watcher Star Adventurer star-tracker holds this scope with a good margin. Have taken some gorgeous pictures with this combo myself.

Hard to give advice to newbies on this topic. I went in head first, no experience whatever, and bought a medium size eq-mount and a 8" reflector. It was not cheap, but I was lucky. It worked! Very easy to waste money on things that don't fit together, or don't fit good to the things you want to image. But money used on a star-tracker is never wasted. Once you have it, you will never sell it. Good place to start. And the ST80 isn't the worlds best scope, but hey, if you decide to advance in this hobby, you can always use it as a guide scope!

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Thanks for taking the time to reply i really appreciate it

I will get a ring adaptor as there only cheap on amazon and see what I get through the dob in terms of focus

I do have a skywatcher 102 mak on an eq2 stand with a motor could I utilise this? And if the mak is no good add a st80

Basically I have the mak and zwo to try planetry and found that whst this would be good for planets it couldn't fit the moon in without a reducer

I noticed a star tracker head for £90 Wonder if this would fit on eq2 stand

It like an onion layer this hobby but will check out star tracker and st80 tube I assume this would take the camera comfortably without the focus issues of the dob

 

Thanks again

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8 minutes ago, LunarRob said:

will check out star tracker and st80 tube I assume this would take the camera comfortably without the focus issues of the dob

It will. But most ST80's has a focuser for the smaller eyepieces. I had to do some wizardry to get my Canon adapter to fit, but I managed with things from my drawers. For deep sky imaging you will need a mount or tracker that follows the sky. They must have motors, and they must be polar aligned. If the motors have controllers, you can hook them up to a computer, and if you have two motors with controllers you can do guiding and plate solving. The world of DSO imaging is at your feet.

If you get your hands on a StarAdventurer tracker head, you will still need a wedge (or foot) to hold it still while polar aligned. The dovetail bracket and counterweights are also handy. A ball head to. I use my StarTracker on my old HEQ5 tripod, yours should be OK with some tweaking, but I'd recommend the accesories that goes with the full kit.

My rig, and two images. 30 sec exposures, less than one hour total on each.  Was meant as an experiment, pleasently surprised over the result.

Horsehead.jpg

Orion.jpg

Tracker.jpg

Tracker-2.jpg

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Thanks will take a look at the star adventure mounts and a refractory, in the mean time I will attach to the dob and see what I get

After looking the camera lenses are as expensive as the scopes

Nice pictures there, looks like it was a little cool out then 😄

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You can use the camera as is on a fixed tripod but you'll be limited in what you can capture without star/target trailing. Generally less than 5s or so exposures at 50mm odd, but you can capture open star clusters, or just stars, M45 Pleiades, M31 Andromeda and M42 Orion Nebula as it's so bright. For deep detail you'd need a star tracker or goto/tracking mount, or take thousands of images and stack, with a tracking mount that thousands becomes a few hundred because you can keep the shutter open for longer per image.

I wouldn't dismiss camera body glass, I've found some are better than telescopes for imaging. The majority aren't very good though, and be sure to expect distorted stars at the edges, fixed primes work best rather than variable zooms.

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Well after looking around I'll tell you what you already know, this astro hobby ain't cheap. Also I find people want too much for used gear eg £50 less tan brand new for effectively 2nd hand stuff and despite descriptions saying its hardly been used or as new we don't really know the history of it and so it's got to be worth the gamble from buying new with a warranty especially on things like star guides etc

Anyway I have bought a samyang 135mm lens and decided to see what I can get using the camera only seen as I already have an 8" dob and a 102 mak and astro camera for planetry

So I'm just looking at mounts now I can see the star adventure gti for £415 but will need a tripod or the 2i WiFi pro pack for £260 but again will need a tripod

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1 hour ago, LunarRob said:

this astro hobby ain't cheap

Indeed, and it takes a considerable amount of restraint (like an addiction) to stop buying more stuff.

Your first purchase (SY135) is one of the best astro purchases you can make, better than most telescopes due to its size, speed of data acquisition, sharpness and relative cost (though quality can vary between units). Now you'll need a tracking mount as you won't be able to use that focal length fixed unless you're just imaging stars or constellations.

If you contribute to this forum you'll in no time at all be able to access the classifieds from us astro users, so better idea of quality of items. I always say, "buy the seller, not the item", this applies to most walks of life, a good seller will be able to talk a lot about their purchases, issues they've had, how they've overcome them, honest opinions with both positives and negatives.

The cheapest commercial tracker I've used is an Omegon LX, mechanical, but I think it may struggle with 135mm. The one I got after that was an azgti, then quickly converted it to use in equatorial mode with full autoguiding and asiair control, it completely transformed my imaging, and even visual use. The latest "upgrade" (because the azgti is still a current item) is the Star Adventurer GTI (don't bother with the standard SA, you'll find it frustrating to setup, some like it, I didn't and the azgti was the solution FOR ME, as it has goto you'll thank me later).

If you're in it long term, get a heavier duty goto mount, or a harmonic drive if you can afford it, if you get the right one for your needs it's unlikely you'll ever change it.

Do not skimp on the tripod+mount. I've split it because Ive found the tripod is the most critical part of the rig, you can have the best mount in the world but if it's poorly mounted you won't get any reliable images (or visual use). I've usually sourced mine individually, but I can vouch for the thick steel leg tripod from Skywatcher, it's very sturdy as is the literock from ioptron.

But yes, try to stick to a firm budget, if not you'll quickly drain your finances. You'll find opportunities to use such gear in this country few and far between, unless you live in a 50pc+ annual clear night sky part of the world.

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Thanks Elp some good advice and I know what you mean re budgeting and return easy to end up with all the gear and no idea.. Well if you have lots of money, which i don't, but I do believe in researching and getting things that will see you forward rather than finding limitations and wasting more money down the line

So with the canon 2000 and 135 lense the most important thing now is a good tripod and mount

Im just looking at the avx and how that compares to the explorer gti

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Posted (edited)

The first thing to consider in the beginning of reasonable imaging is the mount, particularly it's accuracy and maximum load capacity. If it's neglected in the beginning it often comes back after some time, when you want to buy another optical instrument, which usually is heavier.

Just compare specifications of the AVX and GTi. 

 

Edited by Vroobel
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So I went for the star adventurer gti from FLO with tripod and extension (what is the extension exactly?)

is there anything else I would need to attach the camera to this and also maybe a intervalometer thing to remotely take the shot's

 

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/equatorial-astronomy-mounts/sky-watcher-star-adventurer-gti.html

thanks

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8 minutes ago, LunarRob said:

So I went for the star adventurer gti from FLO with tripod and extension (what is the extension exactly?)

is there anything else I would need to attach the camera to this and also maybe a intervalometer thing to remotely take the shot's

 

https://www.firstlightoptics.com/equatorial-astronomy-mounts/sky-watcher-star-adventurer-gti.html

thanks

I'm a noob but have the sw gti tripod and pier/extension since February. Using the pier instead of extending the legs of the tripod keeps it low whilst making sure my dslr doesn't hit the tripod legs.

It also looks pro ;)

I'd highly advise searching YouTube for every sw GTi video.

I'd also suggest doing same for how to polar align, especially if you've never done it before. If only to understand the basics of it.

Also Nina control software is incredibly amazing even for a total noob as I was and still am.

I haven't looked through the polar alignment scope since about march :)

 

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Posted (edited)

As mentioned the pier is so the back end (usually refractors, but any longish scope) remains in clearance when the OTA is pointing close to zenith or near vertical, it's required for tripods due to the angle of the legs, it's not an issue if mounted onto a pier or pier type tripod.

@TiffsAndAstro can assist with included accessories, I suspect you'll need a vixen dovetail bar, and associated 1/4 inch UNC thread bolt to attach the camera to the dovetail bar, this then attaches into the saddle of the mount. You could get a William Optics DSD bar (simpler budget vixen bars are cheaper), as theyre both Vixen (turn it over) and Arca swiss for flexibility if you use Arca swiss clamps.

You may need to source a mains power adaptor or 12v battery pack to power the mount, with my azgti batteries were completely unreliable.

You (may) also need a dew heater band depending on the humidity in your area, I find usb powered ones the most flexible as you can power them with mobile phone power banks. The SY135 is a huge chunk of 60mm glass and dews up in winter or in marsh type environments.

You only then need an intervalometer.

Edited by Elp
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i bought the power supply 'bought by others' from flo with my mount. its medical grade (?) but my only criticism of it is the connector to the mount is straight and not right angled. its worked a treat.  it was about £40 quid though.

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Hi guys, my samyang lense came but the issue I have is when balancing it for ra and dec as the camera only has one bolt into the dovetail it wants to pivot on that due to the weight

Is there a better way of doing it?

IMG_3650.jpeg

IMG_3651.jpeg

IMG_3652.jpeg

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Posted (edited)

Larger lenses can have a foot on the lens rather than attach to the camera body to help with balance.

like this

https://www.amazon.co.uk/iShoot-Compatible-180-600mm-Arca-Swiss-Stabilizer/dp/B0CLZNP8YJ?source=ps-sl-shoppingads-lpcontext&ref_=fplfs&psc=1&smid=A6PLHIZCW59QI

finding one that fits your lens is the tricky party.

Edited by Earl
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Posted (edited)

This fits my SY135s though I've got the videography versions, it clamps around where the Samyang F2/135 text is (Amazon product description, comes up as first result around £20):

71mm Tripod Collar Mount Ring 1/4" for SIGMA APO 70-200mm F2.8 II EX DG MACRO HSM Lens

It's not all plug and play however, I ripped off the felt and replaced it with two layers.of adhesive rubber for a tight lens fit.

The base is also Arca swiss so you'll need to bolt it in two places minimum onto a vixen dovetail to stop rotation.

I have managed to stop camera rotation on a traditional camera mount hole, but it requires jigging onto other plates so you have physical stops touching the camera body to lock and prevent rotation.

Edited by Elp
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Thanks all, I wasn’t sure if there was a specific mount I should have but it looks like your on your own a bit fitting these things together which is fine

i’ve done a high tech fix of some rubber under the collar where the ring would attach so the pressure creates enough of a mounting point to stop it moving but will get a ring as per the links

now to look through the forum for the settings to apply to the lense and what object I can get easiest

its not ideal around here as lots of cloud but if I can get a small break would like to practice the whole process of then stacking and editing the pics to get some practice in 👍

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Sometimes simple is best. Before you get a ring measure the diameter of where you're likely to clamp it, I had some verniers handy so it was easy to measure.

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5 hours ago, Vroobel said:

WO RedCat 51(?) ring matches in think, moreover, it has a shoe for guider. 

 

 

Look at the second picture.

 

 

 

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Hi guys so I bought a ring mount and a 2.5mm to 2.5mm shutter release cable as below

it took a bit of fettling but a small strip of rubber in the ring allowed it to clamp nice and tight between the 2 adjusters on the scope and I managed to find 2 mount points to the dovetail

Tonight I managed to briefly polar align the stand before the clouds rolled in. I realised that you have to turn the mount 90dg so the tube hole allows the polar scope to align through it” I then adjusted the camera lense until I could see the star clearly through the lense

its a steep learning curve for me with the dslr and lense. The back ring on the Samyang lense adjusts the aperture allowing more or less light and the front focuses so I guess I adjust these until it looks clear and it will be trial and error experimenting

i need to read up on the camera settings re finding all the best settings but so far set capture to raw and struggle to work out how to adjust the capture settings in manual mode

i also need to pick a simple ‘first object’ and look up the exposure time etc

anyway if your still reading this, thanks for staying with me, waiting some clear skies

can I take some pics during the day and start experimenting with stacking images and using pixinsight?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IMG_3656.jpeg

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