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toml42

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About toml42

  • Rank
    Star Forming

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    toml42@gmail.com
  • Website URL
    http://www.exoskies.blogspot.co.uk/
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    toml42

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  • Location
    Exeter
  1. Thanks for the comments everyone, festoons it would appear to be then!
  2. Was observing Jupiter earlier and thought there was a particularly striking 'bruise', so i took a quick snap with my webcam. The only time i remember seeing a feature like this is in pictures after impact events, could that be what it is? Or are very dark features like that more common than I realise?
  3. Ah, coma would explain that. In future try and keep your small targets close to the centre of the frame to avoid this effect, but as has been stated, polar alignment is still very important!
  4. How to improve - do exactly what you're doing but for longer There is a hint of trailing in the ring and the dumbell, I think, so if you want to try and push for longer exposures make sure you are very exacting with your polar alignment.
  5. Very sharp, almost seems to pop out the screen! Impressive considering the number of subs
  6. It seems strange that you can't remove that band with a flat field :/ Is this image after attempting to flat field?
  7. That is gorgeous! Loads of wispy detail
  8. Between my final exams, graduation, time abroad and the APALLING weather this year, it has been some time since I've managed to get out with a scope. The last two nights have been a lot of fun just getting to use the equipment at long last! I'm a little rusty, but here's what I've got so far: M92, 30x60 second. A nice easy one to start off with, to make sure I still knew how to work everything! Decided to go for something a bit more challenging and tracked down stefans quintet. Apparently my dark frames weren't quite up to scratch. Only managed about 15 minutes of data before simultaneous cloud cover and misted mirrors ended the night, but I'm quite pleased with the initial results, might try this one again! Night 2: Decided to go back to an old favourite, 203 x 60 second subs in H-alpha. I was delighted to find that I'd managed to capture the faint outer shell, so I assembled a composite image. I put it down to the significantly darker skies I get at home! I'm glad to be back in the game, and I'm looking forward to spending more time on this forum once more!
  9. toml42

    Deep sky

  10. Oh yes, they didn't explain that part of course :/ It was pretty interesting to see that in principle the energy density to do some work was there though - although not enough to get up to relativistic speeds. http://arxiv.org/abs/0908.1429v1
  11. Am I the only person that actually sees the sun as being white? apart from when rising and setting, but then the moon looks orange too under those circumstances.
  12. I saw a paper a while back that actually proposed a starship engine under the assumption that dark matter was its own antiparticle. It was a fun piece of speculation, a gigantic dark matter scoop would gather up the particles and force them together, similar in concept to the old bussard ramjet.
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