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RJ901

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Everything posted by RJ901

  1. Great catch; I should have noted there would be a shift in time due to latitudinal differences. As a reference, I observe from 35.1N. Thanks!
  2. It’s crazy, and makes me want to move to darkest wilds to be able to see all of the faint ones, but the wife will have none of that!
  3. That's awesome. I was wondering what those smudges might have been before scrolling down. Great work!!
  4. RJ901

    Hi, from Memphis!

    Thanks all!!! Thoroughly enjoying the lounge!
  5. 10 for me... should have been more, but for the horrific weather we've had for the past month here in Memphis, Tennessee. 5 of those sessions were actually in Uruguay, where I was on vacation the end of January. Got "this" close to finishing the AL's Southern Sky Telescopic program (40 of the 50 observations). But it was a thrill to see Omega Centauri, 47 Tucanae, the Carina Nebula, LMC, SMC, etc. I bought my nephews, who live there, a Meade 130 mini-lightbridge, with the ulterior motive of getting to use it myself, and what a great little go-scope that is. I'll try to go through my notes and pictures to post a review at some point. What a great experience; I'm already looking forward to the eclipse next year, when I'll be able to test it out on the South's winter skies!!
  6. At the intersection of boredom, astronomy and excel lies my analysis of the objects within the NGC (sorry if this is old news). I made these tables using the data from the NGC/IC Project. It may help in further organizing your observational data, or planning, it might not, but it's kind of neat to see the breakdown by objects within the catalog (and it was fun to put together). Let me know if you catch any errors and I can update! -Rick Some interesting findings: I knew there were a bunch of galaxies in the NGC, just was not aware that 80% of all the existing, non-duplicate objects were galaxies There are more Double Stars in the NGC than Planetary Nebulae 7840 NGC entries, but only 5724 unique and existent objects (maybe 5723, depending on NGC 1990) 234 Entries are duplicates (or triplicates) The only duplicated entries are of galaxies There are 82 entries for which objects do not actually exist 83 is probably the real count if you say NGC 1990 does not exist January-April is a great time for open clusters June-August is a great time for globulars Any month is a great month for galaxies July and August are great for planetary nebulae 257 NGC objects are stars, doubles stars or triple stars Triples, Doubles and Single Stars are fairly evenly distributed across the catalog Total Objects in the catalog by Type: NGC Obect Type # of NGC Entries Duplicated Entries # of Unique NGC Objects % of Total % of Existing Objects Most Entries by Type within One NGC Range (Ex: 1-999 or 3000-3999) NGC Range with Most Objects by Type NGC Range with Second Most Count of the Second Most Entries by Type Gxy 6271 234 6037 79.4% 80.2% 890 4000-4999 5000-5999 875 OC 678 0 678 8.9% 9.0% 245 2000-2999 1000-1999 154 GC 142 0 142 1.9% 1.9% 73 6000-6999 1000-1999 30 Star 115 0 115 1.5% 1.5% 23 1-999 4000-4999 18 Neb 111 0 111 1.5% 1.5% 47 2000-2999 1000-1999 31 Double Star 106 0 106 1.4% 1.4% 17 6000-6999 1-999 13 PN 98 0 98 1.3% 1.3% 49 6000-6999 2000-2999 14 OC+Neb 89 0 89 1.2% 1.2% 44 1000-1999 2000-2999 17 Ast 69 0 69 0.9% 0.9% 19 6000-6999 2000-2999 18 Triple Star 36 0 36 0.5% 0.5% 9 2000-2999 1-999 3 GxyCld 22 0 22 0.3% 0.3% 11 5000-5999 1-999 0 MWSC 8 0 8 0.1% 0.1% 8 6000-6999 N/A 0 SNR 6 0 6 0.1% 0.1% 5 6000-6999 1000-1999 1 HIIRgn 6 0 6 0.1% 0.1% 3 4000-4999 3000-3999 2 Neb?* 1 0 1 0.0% 0.0% 1 1000-1999 N/A 0 Nonexistent 82 0 0 1.1% ---- 19 1000-1999 7000-7840 17 Total 7840 234 7524 Neb? *refers to NGC 1990 Objects by Type and Position within the Catalog: NGC Number Galaxy Galaxy Cloud Nebula Questionable Nebula Open Cluster and Nebula Open Cluster Globular Cluster Planetary Nebula Super Nova Remant HII Region Milky Way Star Cloud Triple Star Double Star Star Asterism Nonexistent 1-999 834 6 4 0 12 49 8 4 0 0 0 6 16 23 5 8 1000-1999 646 0 31 1 44 154 30 4 1 0 0 3 13 13 10 19 2000-2999 596 4 47 0 17 245 5 14 0 1 0 9 12 17 18 8 3000-3999 873 1 8 0 2 21 1 7 0 2 0 3 15 10 0 7 4000-4999 890 0 0 0 0 12 5 2 0 3 0 2 5 18 3 7 5000-5999 875 11 1 0 0 28 15 7 0 0 0 2 14 11 2 5 6000-6999 634 0 15 0 12 120 73 49 5 0 8 6 17 6 19 11 7000-7840 689 0 5 0 2 49 5 11 0 0 0 5 14 17 12 17 Total 6037 22 111 1 89 678 142 98 6 6 8 36 106 115 69 82
  7. RJ901

    NGC 1528

    Love this idea! Thanks!
  8. RJ901

    NGC 1528

    Thanks! Trust me, I don’t have too much I care to share in public either!!
  9. RJ901

    NGC 1528

    NGC 1528 at 150x Spent just under 45 minutes at the eyepiece, so ran up against the issue of field rotation (really for first time in my limited sketching experience) and realized the importance of not only anchoring features to certain areas within the eyepiece, but also (and probably more importantly) using the relative locations between 3 and 4 stars at a time to make as accurate a sketch as possible.
  10. One shot (live photo) with iPhone 8+, not sure which EP I used... 32mm Plossl? 10" Dob, processed to enhance details on the phone with Photoshop Mix (adjusted contrast, clarity and saturation up, shadows down) and crop.
  11. Gassendi Crater and Surroundings One of the most interesting areas of the moon containing a huge array of various features. Seeing was just OK; this was the best out of a dozen or so shots. I may have gotten carried away with the labels, but the act of labeling was fun and greatly helped expand my understanding this portion of the moon. The detail in Gassendi and the area surrounding the Agatharchides craters were particularly fun to explore. 26 Feb 2018 Memphis, TN iPhone 8 Plus, Zoomed to 1.5x Sky-Watcher 10” Dob 3.2mm Agena Astro ED Eye Piece Orion Steady Pix EZ Smart Phone Adapter Tags manually added with Photoshop Mix No other adjustments made
  12. RJ901

    IC 4996

    Thanks, Rune! Practice is helping immensely. My first sketches were mainly just doubles for the AL Double Observing program; seeing other sketches online inspired me to try other objects. I think it will be a long, long time before I can match some the work i’ve seen here on the forums; talented folks, indeed!!!
  13. RJ901

    IC 4996

    The ongoing deluge continues in my neck of the woods so, instead of enjoying the lack of a moon, I’ve scanned my first sketch, made this past October: Open Cluster IC 4996, in Cygnus. I’ve got a long way to go, especially with getting the scale right, but I definitely enjoy the almost Zen like state of focus that I fall into while spending 30+ minutes on one DSO. It’s also made me spend more time on each object while not sketching; its incredible the details that pop out after 15+ minutes, even in light polluted skies.
  14. RJ901

    Comets

    These are awesome!! Having just started with sketching, I have hopes that in 35 years I’ll be able to look back on a stack of sketches half as brilliant. Great stuff!
  15. This one of M35 uses 6 different live photos, and three masks to fool around with exposure at different locations. The additional photo layers really helped to calm the blue noise. January 13, 2018 Memphis, Tennessee, USA iPhone 8+ Orion SteadyPixEZ 10” Dob Bluetooth shutter remote Photoshop Mix iOS app
  16. Incredible results! This has inspired me to get the nightcap app a try some fainter targets (if the clouds ever leave).
  17. M42 and M43: my first target using the new Orion SteadPix EZ. Once all set up, Orion's SteadyPix EZ works really well (though it can be tough swapping lenses on a dark night). This pic is actually just one shot made into three layers: 1 layer for is the entire picture, one layer with the main body of M42 cut out, and one layer consisting only of M43. I stacked and processed them on the iPhone with the Photoshop Mix application. I found that playing with the stacking transition settings (Blend) yielded the best results when using the following options: Normal, Brighten or Punch. Cutting away portions of the various layers allowed me to expose just the portion I wanted, so the dimmer nebulousness came through without destroying the rest of the photo. For me iPhone afocal AP is the way to go... until I can trick my wife into allowing me to buy a an EQ mount, guide scope, imaging OTA, CCD sensors, etc... 13 January 2018 Memphis, Tennessee, USA Sky Watcher 10" Dob iPhone 8 Plus Sky: NELM 4.5-5 Bortle Class 7-8 Edit: Used a cheap bluetooth shutter remote to actually take the photo
  18. RJ901

    Hi, from Memphis!

    Thanks for the welcome all! I wish I had great skies... my NELM is 4.5 - 5. Luckily I do have a nice spot about 45 minutes away that I can escape to!
  19. RJ901

    Hi, from Memphis!

    Hi, all! I've been into astronomy for as long as I can remember, usually from the couch watching shows regarding the subject or reading books, and never got hands on until last January I purchased a 10" Sky-Watcher Traditional Dob. Best decision ever!! Since then I can be found outside on almost any clear night fighting the Bortle 7-8 skies here and have logged hundreds of unique observations; I'm hooked. The next logical step in my path towards increased addiction seemed to start posting in forums, so here I am.
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