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About this blog

A blog to discuss using an unmodified Nikon D7500 DSLR for Astrophotography.

Entries in this blog

 

D7500 has high thermal pattern noise

In an earlier post I examined the noise in single dark frames over a range of exposure times.  My conclusion was that the Nikon D7500 was a lower noise camera than the D5300.  This was also backed up by an examination of master bias frames that again strongly favoured the D7500. However ... The first image I attempted to produce with the D7500 exhibited very strong streaks in the noise. I had been in the habit of not using dark subtraction with the D5300 as it has very

MikeODay

MikeODay

 

Nikon D7500 -v- D5300 Dark Frame comparison ( Astrophotography )

Below is a comparison between single dark frames taken with the Nikon D7500 and D5300 with exposure durations varying from 1 sec to 240 sec ( my usual main light frame exposure ) all at ISO400. Firstly a graph of the standard deviation of the noise in the dark frames versus exposure time: The standard deviation of the noise is a fairly constant 2 ADU less for the D7500 compared to the D5300 ( pretty much the difference in the read noise between the two ) However, the differen

MikeODay

MikeODay

 

D7500 - Read noise and patterns in bias frames ( Astrophotography )

The Nikon D5300 has a well-earned reputation as one of the lowest noise DSLR cameras used for Astrophotography.  Now that I have a new Nikon D7500, I was keen to see how it compared to the D5300 in terms of the level of read noise and the extent to which that read noise is non-random ( and thus needs to be removed using a Master Bias frame to prevent it summing up during image integration).    So here goes ... ......... A single bias frame Nikon D5300: ISO400, 1/4000th second:

MikeODay

MikeODay

 

My new love - the Nikon D7500

It was love at first sight when I first laid eyes on the gorgeous noise curves of my dear Nikon D5300; young and beautiful with a great body and a large sensor, I was smitten.  Now, well, what can I say... my roving eye has spied a new beauty; younger with heaps of energy that should go all night and , whilst I do prefer larger sensors, I can’t stop thinking about the noise curves hidden beneath that lovely new body...   I struggled with my guilt for ages, I really did, but the time has com

MikeODay

MikeODay

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