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New Supernova in Messier 101


PaulB
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Thanks for the new report Michael. It seems to be dropping fast in brightness!

I'm still hoping to get a shot when it gets to 13th mag. and matches the 13-14th

mag stars on either side of it. Then I can place my similar shot, when it was 10th

mag, side by side with the new image for a cool:cool: comparison example (can you

tell this is my first SN?)! I just wish this was all happening at the zenith

for better imaging and hours of observation!!!

Bill

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Good observation again, Michael!

Looks like my intended photo opportunity is about

to happen, with the SN closing in on 13th magnitude.

Unfortunately we've got snow and/or heavy rain in

our forecast during the next few nights! We'll see.:D

Are you able to image any of your views?

Bill

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Good observation again, Michael!

Looks like my intended photo opportunity is about

to happen, with the SN closing in on 13th magnitude.

Unfortunately we've got snow and/or heavy rain in

our forecast during the next few nights! We'll see.:D

Are you able to image any of your views?

Bill

I only have some planetary imaging kit, which is not really suitable for this kind of imaging.

Hope you will get your shot.

Cheers

Michael

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Nice images, smerral! You can see the loss in brightness from your images by comparing to the two closest stars on either side. In the top photo they are brighter, indicating a longer exposure. The supernova has roughly the same brightness in both. Relative to the two foreground stars, it has faded. It is still quite bright, of course. This is the first supernova I have been able to track for so long.

I was going to compile my own light curve for this supernova. Maybe I should expand that to an SGL light curve from observations posted by members.

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This is my cue, Michael! Thirteenth mag is what I've been

waiting for. It should be clear tonight, though uncomfortable,

with snow on the ground. The Big Dipper is also flat on the horizon,

so I won't have much time to image the SN.

The previous nights were terrible, with a Nor' easter passing through.

For my comparison image, I just need the field similiar to the one

below showing the SN with comp stars, when it was 10th mag.

However, this pic was obtained under much more favorable conditions!

Bill

sn2011attendantscrop034.jpg

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It happens that the Supernova is still not as dim as the 13th mag

stars on either side of it. I'd like to get an image when the three match.

I've corrected a previous magnitude map for better accuracy. I'm

thinking when the magnitudes don't seem the brightness they are labled, it may

be due to undisclosed variability of that star. Hmmm, I made that up! Amazing what one

will write when he's tired!! An unsteady atmosphere could also affect the visual luminosity

of a star, making it look brighter or dimmer than a star labled equally in the same image.

Anyway, the SN still seems a little brighter than the brightest star closest to M101's

core; 13.63 mag. GSC 3852-1194. I'm giving 2011fe a magnitude 13.2 for October 30.

Still waiting for that match!

Bill

Magnitude and field Guide.

img0394magconfirm2011fe.jpg

Luminosity of SN 2011fe on October 30. Antares 152mm afocal. Canon T1i, Single image. 54s @ ISO1600.

img0456sn2011feoct30.jpg

Edited by wcgucfa
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I'm having difficulty finding M101 at this point! The search is the rub!

It was cold on the 30th with frost forming fast. I'm sure most of us have

started freezing and lost patience with the hunt, ending in wrong drive

buttons being pushed (or not!). The stars I use to hop to the galaxy are

now almost invisible, blending into the light pollution!

This all still hasn't converted me to Go-To, though. When the mission

is finally accomplished and I bring back those tiny points of light for processing,

it is sooooo satisfying!

Clear skies, Michael

Bill

Edited by wcgucfa
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After further exam of images taken on 10/30,

I'm revising my magnitude estimate of the SN

2011fe to 12.8. Through rested eyes, it is simply

brighter than 13th mag.!

Knowing very little of this type of object, but

learning fast, (hold back the smirking lips!) is it possible

for the SN to do a turnaround in luminosity?:)

Humbly,

Bill

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After further exam of images taken on 10/30,

I'm revising my magnitude estimate of the SN

2011fe to 12.8. Through rested eyes, it is simply

brighter than 13th mag.!

Knowing very little of this type of object, but

learning fast, (hold back the smirking lips!) is it possible

for the SN to do a turnaround in luminosity?:)

Humbly,

Bill

Not usual. But do not forget that much depends on the spectrum of the object when it is so low in the sky. CMOS chips and CCDs can tend to pick up red more than the naked eye, so this might further enhance the SN at the expense of stars with more blue in their spectrum.

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Excellent, Michael. Hey, maybe I wasn't so far off in estimate

on the 30th after all!:)

I'm wondering if the fact that I use the tungsten setting on all my

images to combat the HP Sodium vapor streetlight cast has

something to do with my at least being close to the true magnitude?

I don't think you'll be needing that "big question mark" on your observation!

The AAVSO has a tutorial on mag estimates with a DSLR and/or

a point and shoot camera.

Glad you had a chance to get out again!

Bill

Edited by wcgucfa
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I can't wait to see your report after using the 16" RC!

If I'm not prying, how is it you have access to such a

wonderful instrument?

Bill

I work in the Computer Science department of the University of Groningen. The telescope is on top of our building, as part of the Astronomy department's practical system. I collaborate with guys from that department, so can weedle my way in.

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Thought that I failed finding the Supernova last night after an

hour plus of searching in the light of the 86% illuminated Moon.

I checked my search camera images before discarding them and found

six images of the M101 field. Go-To is starting to look really

nice to me! I'm giving the target a 13.2 magnitude.

I had to keep the cam exposure down due to overexposure

of the bright background sky.

Please don't strain your eyes too much on the image!

This was all invisible to the eye without the camera.

I'm waiting for Luna to pull back before the next observation!

Bill

11/06/2011, 1935hrs EST

The SN is the lower left star in the triangle of stars below, with the smudge

of M101 barely visible to the left with its nearby 13.6 star, at 11:00 from the

galaxy center.

Sony DSC F-707, 25s, ISO400. Afocal, Antares 152mm refractor.

dsc00353adjoct62011.jpg

Edited by wcgucfa
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