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cap603

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About cap603

  • Rank
    Nebula

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  • Location
    Western Pennsylvania
  1. Thanks for the replies. Almost too many options.....
  2. I have just acquired a Canon EOS T2i DSLR and would like to mate it to my Orion XT8 Dob. Hoping to do some solar shots and possible the brighter planets, etc, as no tracking is available - obviously. Could someone please advise on the best piece of equipment to accomplish that goal? Many thanks
  3. I recently bought the Baader solar film and constructed the home-made filter for a reflector.i.e., the film covers a 3" circle, not the entire opening of the scope. I have an 8" f5.9 Orion XT8. I just tried it out with a 25mm eyepiece, and then with a 2x Barlow. The filter seems to work fine, but I only see a ball of light. Nothing else (except passing clouds). Perhaps I have unrealistic expectations. What should I see? Any other suggestions? Thanks
  4. Perhaps someone has access to better information than I. I'm currently on Prince Edward Island, Canada, in the Atlantic time zone. Last night, July 2nd, at about 10:30 PM a satellite passed over to the east. It was north bound on what had to be a polar orbit. Any ideas on which bird it might have been? On another note, the skies here are air pollution free and almost free of light pollution. The skies have been clear and moonless the last two nights and promise to be the same tonight. It is absolutely amazing what one can see with 10 x 50 binocs under these conditions. As a novice, I was impressed that I was able to identify M4, M39, M32 (but not M110), Lagoon nebula, Trifid nebula, Omega nebula, Eagle nebula, M23, M25, M7, M18 and the double cluster below Cassiopeia. You can make out every spot of light and cloud in the milky way. Truly stunning. Many thanks
  5. This may be old news to some. I just received the link from the Amateur Astronomy Association of Pittsburgh (Pennsylvania): Astro Eyepiece Calculator
  6. Discovery and ISS just passed overhead at 0022 Zulu, 1922 local, here in Western Pennsylvania. High thin overcast, but no problem seeing both. Took my 16-year old to a local grass airport. ISS trailed Discovery by about 85 seconds. First time seeing both. Also spotted three sun pillars thanks to a heads up from the local Amateur Astronomy Association of Pittsburgh.
  7. I have BOINC installed and the system says it's active, but all the stats, projects, etc, are ZERO. Again, Boinc says it's using my machine when it's inactive, but nothing seems to be getting done. Any suggestions?
  8. Warthog, I have an 8" Dob, F 5.9, 1200mm. I'm considering getting ONE 2" EP from Siebert Optical. Most 2" Siebert EPs have a FOV would be 70mm with 20mm eye relief. I'm primarily interested in DSOs. Any suggestions/guidance? Many thanks.
  9. I've been a SETI-Stargazers Lounge team member for a few months. Nothing was happening and I finally figured out I had to download Boinc. The system tells me it's using my computer (MacBook), but so far I've got zero work units and no "credit." Seems odd. Any advice? SETI didn't answer my inquiry.
  10. Thanks very much. Just found your reply.
  11. It was just so unusual to see a "straight line" on the surface of the moon. It was as though someone had drawn it in with pen and ruler. I'd never heard of it before. I knew there had to be an explanation since the moon is them most scrutinized body in the heavens.
  12. Nicely done. Thank you. Thanks to everyone who has replied. I knew I'd get the answer from this forum.
  13. On the evening of August 19, I was viewing the moon with my 8" reflector at a magnification of 144x. I happened to notice what appeared to be a straight line segment between two craters. The line segment was situated northwest to southeast. It appeared to be a thread or hair in the eyepiece. Of course, it wasn't. It really looks like someone drew it with a ruler and pen. I had never seen or heard of anything like this before. Coincidentally that evening, Fox News Online carried a story about lobate scarps caused by the contraction of the moon possibly due to internal cooling. Apparently, 14 lobate scarps have recently been discovered. I've attached a photo of the scarp with an arrow pointing to the feature in question. I'm attaching two photos; one wide-angle showing the location of the suspected lobate scarp; the other is a cropped enlargement to show detail. Can anyone confirm this is, in fact, a lobate scarf? (FYI, I tried to post this last night but it hasn't appeared on forum, so I'm trying again.) Many thanks.
  14. On the evening of August 19, I was viewing the moon with my 8" reflector at a magnification of 144x. I happened to notice what appeared to be a straight line segment between two craters. The line segment was situated northwest to southeast. It appeared to be a thread or hair in the eyepiece. Of course, it wasn't. I had never seen or heard of anything like this before. Coincidentally that evening, Fox News Online carried a story about lobate scarps caused by the contraction of the moon. A I've attached a photo of the scarp with an arrow pointing to the "line segment." The image is much clearer when magnified, which I hope is possible through this site. Can anyone confirm this feature is a lobate scarp? Has it been noted previously? Needless to say, I was quite surprised to see what appeared to be a straight line drawn in black ink on the surface of the moon. Many thanks.
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