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alright1234

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About alright1234

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  1. The LIGO detected celestial gravitational waves that originate from a 21,000 binary pulsar (PSR 1913+16) that produces a ΔL = 10-18 m disturbance of the interferometer mirror but Creswell-Jackson (2017) discredited the LIGO experimental results as background noise (Creswell-Jackson, Abstract) since the mirror displacement of ΔL = 10-18 m is less than the diameter of an electrons which is to small of a displacement to experimentally measure. The formation of a wave requires a medium, composed of matter yet gravitational waves propagate in vacuum of celestial space that is void of matter. Einstein uses a space-time curvature to justify the formation gravitational waves using the varying relativistic (time-space) translational velocity v that is formed by the earth's daily and yearly motions but gravitational waves that are propagating in stellar space are not effected by the earth's daily and yearly motions.
  2. If the maximum distance that can be determine is less than one light year is modern astronomy a fabrication similar to the photos of the Milky Way galaxy and the LIGO.
  3. Modern astronomers use parallax to determine the distance to a star. After the observer on the earth propagates the distance of the earth's orbital diameter in a six month time interval (fig 33), the change in the angular position of the star is used to determine the distance to the star but the distance to a 4.22 light year star (4 x 1016 meters) is more than 105 times larger than the earth's orbital diameter (2.99 x 1011 m). The earth's orbital diameter is too short of a distance to produce a change in the angular position that can be used to measure the distance to a 4.22 ly star. The resolution required to determine the distance to a 4.22 ly star is calculated using, A/B = cos θ.........................................................................................................................................78 when A/B → 0, equation 78 becomes, A/B = θ.................................................................................................................................................79 Using A as the earth's orbital diameter, B is the distance to a 4.22 ly star, the resolution θ required to determine the distance to a 4.22 ly (4 x 1016 meters) star is calculated, θ = A/B = (2.99 x 1011 m) / (4 x 1016 meters) = 7.475 x 10-6 degrees or 0.027 arcsec....................80 To measure the distance of a 4.22 ly star using the earth's orbital diameter as the parallax reference distance requires a telescopic resolution of 0.027 arcsec (equ 80) which is 3.7 times more power than the Hubble (.1 arcsec). The Hipparcos telescope is described with a resolution of .001 arcsec but the Hubble was launched after the Hipparcos and the Hubble's mirror diameter is 7.9 feet which is eight times larger than the Hipparacos mirror diameter (11 inches) yet the Hipparcos is 100 times more powerful than the Hubble which violates logic. Using A/B = θ when A/B → 0, the maximum distance to a star calculated using the Hubble is, B = A/θ = (2.99 x 1011 m) (3600) / (.1 arcsec) = 1.0764 x 1015 m = 0.114 light years.........................81
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