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Starman

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Everything posted by Starman

  1. Two reasons. 1. The benefit from greater stability would have been trivial compared to the awkwardness of setup. And 2. Sometimes extra height is required to see things which would otherwise be lost behind a hedge! Pete
  2. Some reasonable seeing from my location in Selsey, West Sussex over the last couple of nights. Here are three results for Mars, Jupiter and Saturn from 26 June. Pete
  3. Great view of noctilucent clouds this morning from the beach at Selsey, West Sussex. A very extensive display which elevated in altitude quite considerably over time. Last structures disappeared from view around 04:16 BST. Pete
  4. Ha ha - I don't know about the 'THE' but yes and thanks for being so polite in your initial reply - thinking about it that could have gone horribly wrong! We really appreciate amateur images on the show so thanks for your great Jupiter image as well. Pete
  5. Aw, thanks for being so understanding ? Pete
  6. And a lovely image it was too. Pity about the bloke wittering on in the background though - ha ha! Pete
  7. Thanks for the comments everyone Pete
  8. Jupiter imaged from Selsey, West Sussex last night (June 19th). Seeing was the best I've had this apparition. Lots of detail on view and a rather shy GRS rotating out of view!
  9. What is giving you trouble regarding capturing such a faint object with a 130mm scope? The telescope that caught mag. +17.6 Haumea was a 100mm scope by the way. I threw out a Sky at Night amateur challenge to try and replicated the Hubble Deep Field back in the spring of 2015. Using my own kit from my own back garden the faintest confirmed object was mag. +22.3. Admittedly this was using a 250mm SCT but in comparison, Haumea is a searchlight Pete
  10. Thank you for your lovely comments. It was a great event. I saw my first Mercury transit in 2003 along with my youngest lad who was 10 at the time. Was rather fitting that I was in Leicester for this one as he's at the University up to his neck in finals. Pete
  11. It was cloudy in Selsey (where I live) so I had to travel north. Ended up in Leicester on the dividing line between cloud and Sun. Fortunately the cloud dispersed a little giving me clear skies. I've a lot of stuff to wade through, but here are some of the initial results... Cheers, Pete Lawrence
  12. Took a look at the Moon last night and didn't hold out much hope for Jupiter. Lots of seeing issues. However, Jupiter held up surprisingly well. Here's my first image from last night's session... Best regards, Pete Lawrence
  13. AR12529 getting close to Sun's west limb and the umbra has broken up into several dark cores. Vixen 4-inch apo, Daystar Quark (CS) and ASI174MM camera. Best regards, Pete Lawrence
  14. Ha - thanks! I have seen Humboldt better
  15. Hi all, Here are a couple of images of the Sun from yesterday (14 April). Details of the kit used on the images. Best regards, Pete Lawrence
  16. Decent conditions on April 12h. A great view of two giant lunar craters - Petavius and Humboldt. C-14/ASI174MM/Astronomik IR742/2.5x Best regards, Pete Lawrence
  17. Thanks for the comments! No, it's the non-cooled ASI174MM.
  18. A jittery sky last night with variable transparency for some of the session. However, imaging during the better transparency periods allowed a decent frame rate and AutoStakkert did the rest. Here's the first colour image processed from the session. Grid courtesy of WinJupos. Regards, Pete
  19. Thanks Laudropb! Yes, I think the detail is sharper on the right hand image. I have better results (I think) from this session which I haven't processed yet, so it'll be interesting to see how they come out.
  20. I could convince myself there's a blue cast off to the right of the disc. I've got a load of additional results to wade through, I'll see whether this comes out when I process them. Pete
  21. Thanks for the comments. Peter: That's interesting. I have just done a random sample across a number of regions on the planet and haven't got anything back to suggest that the balance is off. Cheers, Pete
  22. Hi All, I was looking forward to the jet stream decreasing last night but it remained for most of the session, creating high frequency jitters. Despite this and a gusty wind, I managed to get some fairly decent results, covering the GRS coming on disk. Here is one of my results from 4 April compared with a similar view from 6 April (a fraction over 48hrs time difference). Lots of tiny (unless you're on Jupiter of course!) changes visible. At least it shows I'm consistent with my processing - lol! Best regards, Pete Lawrence
  23. Finally got a night of decent seeing when I wasn't away or working! However, the clouds tried their best to ruin the show, truncating the blue capture and limiting it to one result. 3 reds, 4 greens and 1 blue all derotated to form this result from 4 April. Best regards, Pete Lawrence
  24. Thanks for the comments. Gav - that's a pretty quiet Sun! Pete
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