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    Nebula

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    Darkest Oxfordshire
  1. I'll keep looking for those elusive DSO's, having been at this astronomy lark for about 18-months my expectations continue to be reset in terms of what I can see. My backyard is quite dark (no street lights, just those annoying security lights!!) so I'm already spoilt in terms of darkness. Cheers N.
  2. It depends a lot on your scope, your budget and what it is the you want to observe. In my own experience I discovered a website that just set out the different types of Oculars available. But I discovered that after I had acquired a couple of EPs that i later found were less than ideal In short, eyepiece can be very complex, with several lenses that aim to bring all the wavelengths of light the human eye can detect to the eye at the same time. Cheers N. .
  3. It looked more like corn flour in solution to me. Murky with just a hint of particles, but difficult to identify one from the other. N.
  4. Quick update. I got my little 4" scope out last night to see if I could view M13 a little better, or to be precise, a bit closer. My scope has an 1100mm focal length and provides good magnification capabilities but with a narrow field of view. This makes finding stuff up there a bit of a challenge. But luck was on my side and the red dot finder somehow landed bang on target. My first view was using a 40mm EP. M13 was a well resolved murky blob and quite large and bright. To my surprise using a 30mm eyepiece kept the object quite bright, but I didn't resolve any features as such, just more murk and blobiness. A 15mm EP still kept the the object resolved, but by now the brightness was was far less and the resolution was poor. But, I was quite pleased that for once, the scope did show a DS object. Cheers, N.
  5. You'll need to get out after about 11.30pm. Point south, south east. Find Hercules and isolate the right hand side of the square of the constellation and it's about a third of the way down from the top if you form a straight line from the two stars that make the top and bottom corners. I found it using a planisphere, a book of constellations and a red torch. Like you, this is all new to me too! Cheers N.
  6. Sure thing, soon as I get a night where its dark and I don't have work commitments. Will post later in week, hopefully. Cheers N.
  7. Ah! Cheers Steve! Looks like I got a bit mixed-up there. you're right. M13 it was indeed. So there we have it, you think you've found something and then it turns out to be something totally different. Cheers, N.
  8. The forecast was for a partly cloudy night on Saturday, so I was surprised how clear the sky was when the dog had a wee..not that the dog can influence such things, it was just a mild association. As such events have been rare (clear skies, not the dog's toilet habits) I carefully negotiated a pass from the management to "stare in space" and so 12.56am I was settled in the garden with a planisphere and some start charts, together with my trusty bins. I gave-up trying to find Bootes and came to the conclusion it was stuck behind massive tree at the end of the garden and i tried to find Hercules and from that this M31 thingy. Be warned, find the correct square box in the sky first, otherwise you'll waste ages, just like i did. Finally I did find said constellation and on the right hand side of the box was this faint blob. Never has a blob given me more pleasure than that one. Hopefully I can repeat this feat with the scope and try to sense of whatever M31 is. Good hunting, N.
  9. The Backyard Astronomer's Guide is another great book about all things astronomy, even down to things like collimation. N.
  10. Good pair of bins can help a lot. I found the Orion nebula by scanning the skies with my binoculars and they have proven invaluable ever since. I've only got 4 inches to play with and still get a lot of fun N.
  11. OK Moonshine, I'll give it a shot on Friday.... Damn weatherman reckon clear skies, lets see if they're on the money this time N.
  12. Great seeing here tonight, but "pant stars" is still not showing itself to me. But my backyard is mostly southeast so maybe it's stuck in my neighbours roof avoiding line of sight viewing? N.
  13. It should be renamed "pants-stars" because it has been 'pants' as far as I'm concerned. Not one glimmer. Mind you the flipping weather hasn't helped either!!! N.
  14. Flop... Despite the great images posted here, I am still waiting to catch a glimpse of this elusive comet. N.
  15. Wow.... Now that is severe weather PaulM. N.
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