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synapse

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About synapse

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    Nebula

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    Devon, UK
  1. If you hunt about you can get a second hand 550D in good nick for that sort of money. That's the camera I'm currently lusting after. Canons seem a good buy second hand. They seem very reliable if looked after (most I imagine will be, as they can be quite expensive new). I bought one and a couple of friends around the same time (not 550d but all canons). Mines about 5 years old and still going strong.
  2. Well done. My first attempt became a non starter. I was to busy looking at it through the eyepiece and it dissapeared behind a tree Look forward to seeing some more.
  3. That's a lovely image, even without the dust.
  4. There is a really handy timer available for cannon cameras (probably others). It's a third party one. I got mine from amazon. It's about £16 and connects to the 2.5mm jack socket. It allows you to set the length of exposure, number of exposures you want, A gap between them if required and a delay before starting to let it all stabalise, press start and then come back when it's done. This allows exposures pretty much as long as you want. Much handier than a lugging a PC about all the time.
  5. Oops missed another part of question trying to make sure no-one beat me this time. Sorry about that. I havn't done much of this myself, but generally what you do is take lots of exposures (have seen anything from 5 seconds up used this depends a lot on how well your tracking is set and if you have any kind of guiding.) The more total added exposure the better and then you use these subs (sometimes with dark frames, bias frames and flat frames as well) in something like deepsky stacker. I was shocked when I saw this done the first time as at first glance you seem to have less detail than with the subs. then you use photoshop or gimp or something to adjust the levels and curves. This is where you really start to see the magic happen. Looking at other images on here is a good way to go so you can see examples and rough info of what people end up with using different kit and settings. There are loads of guides that can probably do a better job of explaining things than me. Hope this helps and good luck. Look forward to seeing what you get.
  6. With the prime focus method you do away with EPs, and lenses magnification depends on CCD(cmos) sensor size I think. there is no apature to worry about on the camera ( I asume nikons also set this in the lens) , just whack it in full manual mode set the iso and exposure (a timer remote is very handy, lets you set and forget if the scope has tracking) Settings the focus on the scope is the hardest part. You can also do A-focal where you point the camera down the EP, and I did see a thing that allows you to use an eyepiece but I think this may have been a fancy way of doing afocal that makes it easier to line up, but it was £70 odd quid so I didn't look further.
  7. Doh! Beaten to it. I need to learn to type faster.
  8. There is no reason why not. If it's 1.25" eyepiece the you need a one of these (if not then the correct sized one but i'm fairly sure the 130p uses 1.25" eyepieces from a quick google) Adaptors - FLO 1.25-inch T mount camera adapter And assuming that all nikon use the same lens mount (i have no idea about this i'm a canon man i'm afraid so you would need to double check this) the nikon fit one of these, if nikon have different fits for lenses then the appropriate one for you camera. Adaptors - T Rings screw the 2 together into a single item and then one end mounts to the camera and the other end goes in place of an eye piece for prime focus shots. There are other options to do imaging but this is the only one I have done myself so I wouldn't like to comment.
  9. Me and my mate (he has the same scope as you) both loosen the tube rings and twist the OTA to get the ep to an comfy angle. I don't see any other way round it. Maybe someone more experienced may know another way round it.
  10. Welcome to the forum. Would love to see some pics once your all settled and watching the skies.
  11. Good work. I'll have a play with the Tiff later and post results (if they are any good)
  12. Having just got into astronomy I find it quite incredable just what is out there. It's easy to take what's in the sky for granted. Images like this only further my interest. Thanks for sharing.
  13. Something else I found from my first go, once you have located it by eye it can be very tricky to actually point the scope at if your finder/red dot sight is not correctly aligned so I would advise making sure this is done if you haven't already. Spent 15 mins trying with my scope and then found it in about 2 minutes in my mates with a properly aligned finder. We had already located it by eye which is the first part of the battle.
  14. Hoping I have put this in the correct place. My first light was a little bit disappointing (due to my own haste scope was not fully set up) I struggled to locate anything really as my red dot was miles out and I was rather confused by my first go with the EQ mount and the initially rather unnatural motion of it. I did however get some views of the moon and once I had found this was more than happy, although I had also hoped to find M42 at least. Last night I went up to a friends in a very dark location on Dartmoor for another go. Initially we checked the scope was all in order, apart from the declination slow motion control not working correctly it all seemed good to go. We had a little go at getting it working but decided to see how we got on without We managed to find M42 fairly easily and I was rather amazed by how much more there was to see. I did pull out the DSLR but by the time I got it set up and snapped a couple of poorly focused shots M42 had disappeared behind a tree. We moved round to the other side of the house where his setup was busy snapping M51 and tried to grab a look at Saturn, but were once again thwarted by poor red dot alignment. His setup had finished the shots of M51 so we had a look at that for a little while and then finally found Saturn via a properly aligned finder scope. I suppose it just goes to show it really is worth spending a little extra time and care on the setup to get the most out of a scope. It's much easier tinkering in the warm and the light. Anyway we took some shots of Saturn using a webcam which I will share as soon as I manage to process them. All in all it was a thoroughly enjoyable evening. It's safe to say I'm hooked and can't wait for some more clear skies/free evenings to hopefully see more things and take some photos.
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