Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_celestial_motion.thumb.jpg.a9e9349c45f96ed7928eb32f1baf76ed.jpg

Cloudwatcher

Members
  • Content Count

    2,491
  • Joined

  • Last visited

Everything posted by Cloudwatcher

  1. Earlier today I was reading The Universe According to Patrick Moore in the Jan. issue of Sky at Night. He refers to Auriga as sitting in a rich star field due to one of our Galaxy's spiral arms running across this constellation. I was reminded of seeing your image on the Forum and thought I'd take a closer look. Couldn't find it at first.............things move so fast on SGL...... but finally tracked it down here in 'widefield'. I think the gradient concentration referred to by JamesF might in fact be the spiral arm mentioned above. A check on Starry Night Pro seems to confirm this........see attached screen shot. This compares well with your image once the red background is reduced. Good capture.
  2. Cool capture! Great 3D affect achieved with the moons.
  3. There is quite a bit of the blue stuff in amongst the muddy red but I found it pretty hard going trying to separate the two..........difficult to tell where one begins and other ends so to speak.
  4. The short answer is,I don't know. I do most of my stuff in 8bit mode in Photoshop mainly because in higher modes some of the tool are not available.The finished image can be converted to 16 or 32bit after but to be honest unless I zoom in I can't see much difference.......perhaps I should go to Specsavers! Blotches of noise can be treated by isolating in a separate layer and using the blur tools in Photoshop,reducing,in the case of the galaxy arms, the noise to a smoothness that is acceptable. A quick overdone example attached by way of illustration........this may result in the loss of a few stars if your not careful.
  5. My last post was,of course, just a bit of (over sharpened) fun but on a more serious note there is quite a bit of colour to be found in the original image. Never having used GIMP I don't know what tools you have at your disposal so it's a bit difficult to give detailed advise that you can use. I assume levels are available and a method for varying saturation but possibly not the Dodge and Burn facilities. The latter are very handy for bringing out detail when you 'go deep' on an enlarged section of an image. By way of illustration the first image below shows a section where basic Levels and Saturation were used,the second is where Dodge & Burn tools,on an enlarged view,have been put to use. Really all one is doing is changing the contrast between light and dark areas but with more control at your fingertips.
  6. See your galaxy in full living colour on a computer screen near you with........... CW VISION.......
  7. We have guests arriving shortly so I have been told by SWMBO to stop playing and do something useful! Anyway,heres what I've pulled out of the mist so far............still needs a lot more TLC but could be a goodun.
  8. Ah! Yes,I'm afraid I did use Photoshop but looking at the cropped image you posted,which is rather good,I reckon that you should be able to pull out a bit more detail using GIMP......give it a go.
  9. Well,what a rotten couple of posts! Blame it on Christmas! Here's a combi image which I hope is easier to follow.
  10. For some reason I can't seem to get pic.1 to load......... will try again.........there you go........sorry about that.
  11. NGC7635Bubblejpeg 1.psd It's fairly easy to do but rather difficult to explain........perhaps I should keep history notes. I'll try to give you a brief rundown from memory with added pictures! As I recall,the bubble was isolated on the original image and the background tweaked with the levels and exposure tools (pic.1). Colour Balance,Hue/Saturation was then applied shifted towards the red to bring up the background nebula......all a bit hit and miss (pic.2). Next,a layer was made of the area to be cropped and with the background isolated,worked on with the Dodge,Burn and sharpen tools.......again,all hit and miss especially as I'm not very good on nebulae (pic.3) Finally,some blue photo filters were applied (warming and cooling) and the image cropped (pic.4). Phew! I hope that is of some help but the best advise I can give is to just play around with all the tools available till a result is achieved that you like. NGC7635Bubblejpeg 2.psd NGC7635Bubblejpeg 3.psd
  12. NGC7635Bubblejpeg 1.psd It's fairly easy to do but rather difficult to explain........perhaps I should keep history notes. I'll try to give you a brief rundown from memory with added pictures! As I recall,the bubble was isolated on the original image and the background tweaked with the levels and exposure tools (pic.1). Colour Balance,Hue/Saturation was then applied shifted towards the red to bring up the background nebula......all a bit hit and miss (pic.2). Next,a layer was made of the area to be cropped and with the background isolated,worked on with the Dodge,Burn and sharpen tools.......again,all hit and miss especially as I'm not very good on nebulae (pic.3) Finally,some blue photo filters were applied (warming and cooling) and the image cropped (pic.4). Phew! I hope that is of some help but the best advise I can give is to just play around with all the tools available till a result is achieved that you like.
  13. I thought I'd have a go at tracking down a bit more of the 'red stuff' in the background on a cropped separate layer and then recombine........... there's quite a bit to be found but I'm not very good with nebulae,never sure where they finish. Anyhow,heres the result which I think shows up the bubble a little better although it still looks as if it has burst.
  14. I'm not qualified to explain the cause of the purple tinge but this can be resolved in Photoshop with the use of Colour Balance and Hue/Saturation tool. Well worth the effort as you have a fine capture there with plenty of detail to be seen.
  15. Excellant results with the modded camera. Hope you don't mind my having a go at reducing the red background in the M33 image. Not a brilliant result but it does show some of the potential the image has.
  16. Seems to have worked out fine. Could you just confirm the supernova as just left of centre, I'm not familiar with this galaxy.
  17. Caldwell 89 would seem appropriate,don't you think?
  18. You can rduce the red mist at the centre of the image using Gamma Correction in the Exposure Tools. Then play with the Colour Balance sliders......red to cyan,yellow to blue in midtones. Heres one I did earlier.
  19. The games still afoot (30cm) Watson! As Ron says the problem is trying to match FOV and orientation when comparing widefield images of this nature. I trawled through Crab images and came across this one,which,when reorientated,does show some similarities in the star patterns,allowing for the difference in level of detail. Additionally,the 'blob' could be the core only of M1 due to short expose time. Of course this is all hypothetical but it's the thrill of the chase that counts.
  20. Well,thank you Ron (didn't recognise you in your Santa outfit) but I may be wrong........I usually am according to SWMBO. I will await a definitive answer before I change my avatar.
  21. There are stars to be found in the image when stretched in Photoshop...........not all that clear I'm afraid but my vote would be for M1.
  22. A sad day indeed. Still,as a cricketer,I'm sure he took comfort in a game well played and 89 a pretty good score.
  23. Wouldn't want to wear those round your neck for too long and anyway where's the lanyard?
  24. I knew I'd seen that somewhere........It's the 'ghost of kermit nebula'! See the resemblance? Joking aside thats a good capture.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.