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I'm looking at geting a new laptop later on this year. I'll be using it for photography daylight and astro, not sue of buget yet (poss around £450- £650). The question is what laptops and softwhere do you fellow stargazers use for astronomy/ astrophotography?

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Mark,

Any laptop available on the market at the moment will be able to perform perfectly fine with your astro-software of choice (since the requirements for those apps are pretty basic).

I know it's not an answer you are looking for but your question is pretty vague.

Personally I use acer Aspire 5732Z (4GB RAM/500GB HD) and it is a lappy that will do me for a good few years; I bought it new for £359. You could do with way smaller spec for imaging.

For imaging I use Registax (free to download).

Good luck.

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I like to use a netbook for image capture (for the long battery life) but the processing power is limited for general use & the keyboard & screen aren't good enough either. In fact I've never found a keyboard on any laptop or recent desktop that is anywhere near as good as the 24 year old IBM PS/2 keyboard I'm typing on at the moment.

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In fact I've never found a keyboard on any laptop or recent desktop that is anywhere near as good as the 24 year old IBM PS/2 keyboard I'm typing on at the moment.

...old school die hard :D

Regards Brian!

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I'm a Mac die hard, but within your price range I'd definitely think about an ex-corporate Dell, as a previous poster suggested.

I'm forced to use one for work and try as I might I just can't break the thing. They are so robust. I've dropped it. Stamped on it. Thrown it against the fridge and it still just boots up.

Deffo outside friendly IMHO.

Cheers,

Paul

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I bought a new laptop last year and now use my old (4 years) HP laptop running XP for web captures etc - then transfer the avi's to my new one for processing

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If you only want one computer and you intend to do image processing on it, I would say spec it to run photoshop well, As others have said above image capture and scope control can be achieved with a very modest laptop/netbook. Photoshop, however, requires a lot of ram and a fast processor to run smoothly. Also considering the mainly cold, damp environment we operate in with observing/imaging, I'd be inclined to use a cheap netbook for image capture and a posh, high spec, large screen jobby for processing.

You're question stated buy a "new" laptop, does that suggest you have an old laptop? In which case, the old one, assuming it still works, could be the capture and control machine and the new one used for photoshop.

Edited by Rusty Strings

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The only thing I would recommend - is be very careful of getting the lower specs.

I had a Compaq - bought 4(ish) years ago & did everything ok - execpt open RAW picture files. Which if you're using a DSLR for imaging - it has to be RAW file type.

Hence I upgraded to this one 6 months ago,

http://www.pcworld.co.uk/gbuk/hp-pavilion-dv6-3108ea-15-6-silver-laptop-08702307-pdt.html

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The laptop I keep indoors is a Toshiba P200 Satelite and it's really good, no problems even after three years.

18 months ago I bought a little netbook to use outside just for CduC and Sky6. It's a Asus Eee 1005HA and it's the biggest or should I say smallest pile of junk in the world. Within the first year it went back to Asus two times once with a broken screen, and then for refusing to start up. Now it appears to have discharged it's battery and doesn't recharge so only works on AC.

Edited by Doc

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hi i just recently bought this for astro imaging

PACKARD BELL DOT SE-410UK0- Black Netbook at cheap prices | PC World

good battery life does all i need and is small. i have a desktop for doing other stuff plus being a packardbell the hd is already partioned so if i need to restore back to factory setting its very easy. tho the screen is to small to do editing on it comes with ps elements

just my 2p worth

hope you find what your looking for star

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IBM T series, have a look at the T60 or even the T40`s, they are very rugged, good for outdoor use and have long battery life, i use an old T40 for all my computing work

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The laptop I keep indoors is a Toshiba P200 Satelite and it's really good, no problems even after three years.

18 months ago I bought a little netbook to use outside just for CduC and Sky6. It's a Asus Eee 1005HA and it's the biggest or should I say smallest pile of junk in the world. Within the first year it went back to Asus two times once with a broken screen, and then for refusing to start up. Now it appears to have discharged it's battery and doesn't recharge so only works on AC.

was you using it on ac with battery in before battery packed up. as this is biggest battery killer just a heads up for anyone who didn't know you should always remover battery when running it on ac.

Edited by star_chaser

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I use a Thinkpad X60s ...refurbed and an absolute steal at 220 quid. Bullet proof, dual core, 2gig of Ram. Only downside is just 80gb hard disc, but that is fine for capture. Got a 12inch screen and wee light to illuminate keyboard. Same price as netbook but more powerful. Battery life is good on mine.

cheers

richard

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Personally I use acer Aspire 5732Z (4GB RAM/500GB HD) and it is a lappy that will do me for a good few years; I bought it new for £359. You could do with way smaller spec for imaging.

Seconded on the ACERs, you get a lot of spec for your money with these.

My dell XPS packed up after 4 years back in Jan and I did'nt want to pay a similar amount of cash again.

Bought a ACER Aspire 5742 (Intel core i3-370m processor; 4 GB RAM - most important specs in my book; and an unnecessary 320GB HDD) for £440 from the cheapest retailer at the time Amazon.

Compare similar specs to Dells, Sony's, HPs etc and you are paying a serious amount more.

The ACERs are'nt flashy, without the higher spec build like the actual casing, keyboard, speakers etc but the screen is still a decent HD LED LCD BUT for me it's the actual processor and RAM that's important....

Best laptop I've had and I've had loads of different brands and specs whether work or personal ones.

Don't know much about specific astronomical software/apps but Stellarium works perfectly on it and can't imagine anything else being that more demanding.

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Thanks for the info, the reason I'm looking for a new laptop is that the one I got has a cracked screen and it tends to slow down alot

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My acer died after the wife dropped it from about 3ft onto it's edge :hello2:, but replaced it with one of these

fantastic replacement :D dual core 2.0Ghz, 120Gb 7,200rpm sata HDD, usb's and a fw .....

better than the acer I had for 2x the price ! runs XP Pro too BARGAIN!!!!:rolleyes:

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I would heartily recommend a Samsung netbook - the NC10 or NB30 are very good and the latter is "semi-rugged". I use one in the field to control my scope (using stellarium) and my DSLR (using capture control 5.2) and it does everything I need it to.

BUT then I transfer the RAW files to my desktop (quad core) for stacking and image processing. You have to spend a LOT of money to get a laptop that can do that well and my desktop was less than £300 (admittedly without monitor).

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