Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_celestial_motion.thumb.jpg.a9e9349c45f96ed7928eb32f1baf76ed.jpg

Recommended Posts

Newbie here returning after 30 years away from astronomy.

So chaps what do we think reflector or refractor?

Has anyone tried this one out?...

Celestron NexStar 102 SLT Refractor Telescope

I can go to about £450 but after that....

I used a 6 inch refractor in my youth although I could never have afforded such a tool at the time and lent the same from a friend but was always a little scared of breaking it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hex,

Well it depends on what you want to achieve and see but £450 can get you alot of good scopes new and second hand.

You could pick up a 12" standard dob or flextube second hand for £450 and that will give you great views of galaxies and the planets and you can re-learn the night sky at the same time.

Cheers

Neil

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, welcome back !

It all depends on where your interests lie. A 6" refractor is still a big beast and tricky to mount solidly.

A newtonian scope will deliver the "best bang for your buck" by far especially in it's dobsonian mounted form.

Apart from budget, do you have any other constraints such as portability, computer control, particular observing interests ?.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi, welcome back !

It all depends on where your interests lie. A 6" refractor is still a big beast and tricky to mount solidly.

A newtonian scope will deliver the "best bang for your buck" by far especially in it's dobsonian mounted form.

Apart from budget, do you have any other constraints such as portability, computer control, particular observing interests ?.

Roger that! I have a 5.25" refractor (133mm) - it is 7 feet long and tips the scales at 42 lbs. Mounting such a thing is never easy because a long tube is difficult to turn (and stop!) precisely.

If you have an interest in a longer focal length scope for planets and lunar work - consider a Schmidt Cassegrain such as the NexStar 6 from Celestron. Same aperture and focal length as a long refractor, but you can easily transport and mount it, and the scope will quickly convert from f/10 (better for planetary and lunar) to f/6.3 (better for deep sky) with a focal reducer accessory.

My recommendation for all beginners however, is a 6" or 8" dobsonian. Easy to use, quick to set up, almost impossible to mess it up, kids and adults can all use it easily, plenty of targets to see and not a lot of maintainence to do. Very affordable as well.

Dan

PS: if you want to know about a really BIG refractor - check mine out HERE.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Hex,

Ive recently bought a Nexstar 102 SLT and like you have just returned to astronomy after a 20 year absence. My requirement was for a good all-round grab and go scope, as I don't have access to a back-garden. I really like it, though if you have a backgarden I would recommend the Skyliner 200p Dob as others have done, as you get more bang for the buck. The 102 SLT is a great wide-field scope that will come into its own in a dark sky site (unlike London where I live), though the GOTO facility has proved its worth in helping me find faint fuzzies in the London skyglow. If I had a back garden then an 8" or 10" Dob is what I'd want, but that will be a couple of years away at least!

Edited by GeorgeB

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Refractors have their admirers (like me) but the ones over which some people (like me!) go nuts are the ludicrously expensive ones. The Dobsonian reflector easily outsees anything else in its price range.

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You will get much for aperture for your money with a dobsonian reflector. It also can show DSO's much better than any thing else for the same price. Leaving you to spend some money for eyepieces, which are as important as the scope.

HTH

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Hex,

Ive recently bought a Nexstar 102 SLT and like you have just returned to astronomy after a 20 year absence. My requirement was for a good all-round grab and go scope, as I don't have access to a back-garden. I really like it, though if you have a backgarden I would recommend the Skyliner 200p Dob as others have done, as you get more bang for the buck. The 102 SLT is a great wide-field scope that will come into its own in a dark sky site (unlike London where I live), though the GOTO facility has proved its worth in helping me find faint fuzzies in the London skyglow. If I had a back garden then an 8" or 10" Dob is what I'd want, but that will be a couple of years away at least!

I know this sounds a daft question but...what can you see with it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While I fully understand that you get more telescope for your money with a reflector, I would not ignore the advantages of a refractor: trouble free (no colimation); easy to clean and store; usable both day and night with as wide an eyepiece as the focuser will allow (no secondary obestructon); convertable for solar use (with a proper filter). Turn Left at Orion was written for users of a small 50mm to 70mm telescope so all the objects in that should be visible (though I have my doubts about M1). Achromats do show colour fringing, but this is almost absent if you can afford an ED scope. If you do not want to tinker with your telescope, I would recommend a small refractor.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How does it work size/power on the refractor/reflector front...i.e 6 inch reflector = 4 inch refractor, if you see what I mean

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Image scale (how big something looks) depends on the focal length of the scope divided by the focal length of the eyepiece, with around 200X being the most you are likely to use often on the planets.

How bright things look at a given effective focal length (as above) depends on aperture. However, refractors do punch above their weight. Your question is best answered by you yourself getting along to a star party or astro soc and seeing what you think of the view.

I like refractors because of the way that you see things, but you can see more in larger reflectors.

Olly

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.