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Skywatcher 32mm Panaview = AWESOME!


Simms
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I dont think I`ll ever go back to 1.25" EPs again for DSO observing. Managed to finally get out tonight with my new (well, purchased off this forum) Skywatcher 32mm Panaview EP.

All I can say is that its a whole new viewing experience. I paid £40 for this off a user on here and it is certainly worth every penny. So far this evening I have viewed the double cluster near Cassiopeia and just found the Beehive cluster - both are bright, HUGE and full of detail - and thats just on my lowly 150p! We also have dreadful LP tonight so I can only guess at what it would be like at a decent Dark Sky site.

Admittedly at the edges the stars do `smear` a tiny bit, but the majority of the stars are sharp, crisp and well defined. Defintely £40 well spent - only thing is - I dont think I could go back to 1.25" EPs and will now have to see what else is out there in the 2" region.

Anyway, back off outside now - need to go and find something else to view - shame the Pleides is currently behind a tree in my back garden :D

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good to know, glad you like it - that ep is on my purchase shortlist, along with sw aero ed and the meade 5000 swa. though that one is more than i should probably spend, even with current discounts.

am i right thinking the aero is better corrected at the edges? (though, i've read a lot of places that the smearing (coma?) on the edges of the panaview isn't bad.)

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am i right thinking the aero is better corrected at the edges? (though, i've read a lot of places that the smearing (coma?) on the edges of the panaview isn't bad.)

What is seen at the edges of the field of view with these eyepieces is called astigmatism and the Aero ED is better corrected at the edges than the Panaview but then it is also more expensive. It only becomes an issue with either eyepiece, in my opinion, in scopes faster than F/6 and not too pronounced until you get faster than F/5.

Coma is distortion of star images which is caused by the newtonian scope design (rather than the eyepiece). Ironically, it's usually masked by the astigmatism that the eyepieces produce but when you use really well corrected eyepieces you can see the coma :D - then you invest in a coma corrector - more £'s of course :)

Edited by John
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Sounds very promising, thanks for the update. Can you fit the whole pleides into view? Does anyone know if you can on a 200p?

If it's the F/5 the Panaview 32mm gives a 2.2 degree true field of view and if it's the F/6 (the dob) then it's 1.8 degrees.

So either scope would fit the whole of the Pleiades in :D

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Just when I think I've planned out my EP buying somthing like this crops up :)

Currently my 'search EP' is a 32mm GSO plossl. I had decided to go over to a set of Hyperions with the 24mm being my next purchase. I read a thread here that the 24mm FOV would match my 32mm but the extra mag would enhance contrast. Sounded good to me :D

The Panaview price is very good though, hmm......

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You can't beat a good 2" widefield eyepiece for low power sweeping of the sky. Or looking at those large extended objects. Awesome!

And the Panaview is a nice eyepiece to use down to F5. The Aero ED is worth looking out for secondhand, as it comes up for £70-80 and is better corrected.

Don't go ditching all your 1.25" eyepieces though. There's no benefit from having a 2" 15mm 80deg eyepiece over the 1.25" version. The 2" format is simply there to overcome the maximum field stop inherent in the 1.25" design. No other benefit.

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You can't beat a good 2" widefield eyepiece for low power sweeping of the sky. Or looking at those large extended objects. Awesome!

And the Panaview is a nice eyepiece to use down to F5. The Aero ED is worth looking out for secondhand, as it comes up for £70-80 and is better corrected.

Don't go ditching all your 1.25" eyepieces though. There's no benefit from having a 2" 15mm 80deg eyepiece over the 1.25" version. The 2" format is simply there to overcome the maximum field stop inherent in the 1.25" design. No other benefit.

A 1.25" 32mm Plossl with 52deg apparent field has reached the limit. While a 1.25" Hyperion 24mm is also bouncing off the limiter due to it's large 68deg apparent field. And similarly a 1.25" Meade 5000 18mm UWA, despite it's medium power, is also at the limit. This time due to its lovely 82deg apparent field.

Hence to have a Super wide eyepiece (68deg) above 24mm you need a 2" design. And to have an Ultra wide (82deg) above 18mm you need the 2". But absolutely no benefit below these sizes.

Edited by russ
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Thanks for all the info and pointers guys. Still don't know what to buy, mind.

Yeah ditto, something like a televue 32 plossl to a panaview or ED or even a UWA or a panoptic, so much choice not based on trying any of them before you buy either :D

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Just when I think I've planned out my EP buying somthing like this crops up :)

Currently my 'search EP' is a 32mm GSO plossl. I had decided to go over to a set of Hyperions with the 24mm being my next purchase. I read a thread here that the 24mm FOV would match my 32mm but the extra mag would enhance contrast. Sounded good to me :D

The Panaview price is very good though, hmm......

I recently purchased a 24mm Hyperion and compared it with my 32mm GSO plossl before selling it on. The fov with the Hyperion indeed just about matched the GSO but with the added magnification the boost in contrast was really noticeable. The background was much darker and the stars much brighter. The 24mm Hyperion has now become my finder/Dso ep and i would highly recommend it.

Damo

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I recently purchased a 24mm Hyperion and compared it with my 32mm GSO plossl before selling it on. The fov with the Hyperion indeed just about matched the GSO but with the added magnification the boost in contrast was really noticeable. The background was much darker and the stars much brighter. The 24mm Hyperion has now become my finder/Dso ep and i would highly recommend it.

Damo

Thanks, I think I'm back on the collection of Hyperions again. A bit like yours to be honest :D

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hello,

I notice you have a sw150p and are using the panaview ep. did you have to upgrade the focuser or do you use an adapter? I've got the 150pl and you have got me wondering if i could use the same ep?

cheers,

Adamski

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hello,

I notice you have a sw150p and are using the panaview ep. did you have to upgrade the focuser or do you use an adapter? I've got the 150pl and you have got me wondering if i could use the same ep?

cheers,

Adamski

No probs at all, just slots in and works fine..

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You can't beat a good 2" widefield eyepiece for low power sweeping of the sky. Or looking at those large extended objects. Awesome!

And the Panaview is a nice eyepiece to use down to F5. The Aero ED is worth looking out for secondhand, as it comes up for £70-80 and is better corrected.

Don't go ditching all your 1.25" eyepieces though. There's no benefit from having a 2" 15mm 80deg eyepiece over the 1.25" version. The 2" format is simply there to overcome the maximum field stop inherent in the 1.25" design. No other benefit.

A 1.25" 32mm Plossl with 52deg apparent field has reached the limit. While a 1.25" Hyperion 24mm is also bouncing off the limiter due to it's large 68deg apparent field. And similarly a 1.25" Meade 5000 18mm UWA, despite it's medium power, is also at the limit. This time due to its lovely 82deg apparent field.

Hence to have a Super wide eyepiece (68deg) above 24mm you need a 2" design. And to have an Ultra wide (82deg) above 18mm you need the 2". But absolutely no benefit below these sizes.

Thats a really helpful post, thanks Russ. What is the maths involved to work out the maximum field limit? Do you add or times the afov and magnification?

Also is a 52degree 32mm televue plossl directly comparable to a 68degree 24mm hyperion in terms of the wideness of view? I know their contract and magnification are different.

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  • 6 years later...
On 29/03/2011 at 00:03, John said:

If it's the F/5 the Panaview 32mm gives a 2.2 degree true field of view and if it's the F/6 (the dob) then it's 1.8 degrees.

So either scope would fit the whole of the Pleiades in :D

I know this is an old thread, but thats what happens when you look around!

John, I have 1.9° working on a field stop of 40mm (  I measured the narrowest aperture on the field side ) but to be honest, unlike Tele Vue's take on giving everything away, I have not yet found the official measurement for the SWP32mm field stop.
If the field stop is a tad less than 40mm then 1.8° would suffice (you know me, its the detail that counts!)
I'm not disputing our result, just wanting to know / trying to locate the spec for the field stop? 

Edited by Charic
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