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8" Dob helpful upgrades


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I am expecting delivery very soon of my SkyWatcher Skyliner 200P Dob, it comes with a 9x50 straight through finder scope which some find uncomfortable to use, but by changing to a right angled finder then causes problems as the image is a mirror of what you see in the scope.

So rather than changing the finder would a telrad or a rigel quickfinder or something similar, be a pratical accessory/upgrade.

BTW any other upgrades or improvements worth considering?

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Many find that the combination of a Telrad/Rigel/Red dot finder and a regular

optical finder works well. I just use a Red dot finder and a low power wide field

eyepiece to find stuff, works for me.

I think I'd have a few sessions with the new scope, before spending more on extras,

just to see how you get on with the scope as supplied.

Good luck with the new scope, I wish such nice kit was readily available when

I started !! Ed.

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defo a telrad or rigel.the other essential will be a collimating tool.i use a cheshire personally but a laser collimator or even a collimating cap will help good luck with your new scope great choice:hello2:

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I use both a RDF (Quikfinder in my case) and RACI finder, both are good upgrades to the standard 200p. You need a collimation tool of some sort too, but the 200p holds collimation pretty well once it's done.

The other common change is to improve the Az motion of the base, which is not great.

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Hi

IMO I would seek out a copy of the "Sky Atlas 2000"

With that a Telrad and a regular finder you'll have all the gear you need to find pretty much anything.

If you get the laminated version it's tough as old boots and will last a life time.

Regards Steve

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+1 for telrad finder

If you have light pollution keep the optical finder as well. You may need it for the last steps in starhoping. Turn Left at Orion is also great to get you through the learning curve so you can start locating things by yourself.

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Thanks for your replies, i have a Baader Laser collimator MKIII as i knew this is an essential bit of kit for a newt, i am sticking with the straight through finder as it keeps you within the line of sight when finding stars, where as with the right angle finder you are looking at the tube of your scope and then twisting your head around to try and work out what you have in the view finder.

Finally i have ordered a Telrad as this seems a very popular choice indeed and it lies flush with the tube, unlike the quickfinder which is sticking outwards, which may lead it to get knocked now and again, leading to it not being as accurate.

I have the book "Turn Left at Orion" absolutely superb book for the beginner.

I will look into the "Sky atlas 2000" as i have not heard of this until now, i do have the 11" philips Planishere but i am not impressed with it as the writing is very small, even with my reading glasses on and that was indoors :).

BTW. Ben, how do you go about improving the Az motion of the base?

Gaz

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BTW. Ben, how do you go about improving the Az motion of the base?

I'm not the best to answer as i've not done it myself, but there's a common "milk carton" modification where you cut some washers out of a plastic 4-pint milk carton - there have been assorted threads on this before now, e.g.

http://stargazerslounge.com/equipment-discussion/105826-skyliner-200p-dob-raiding-spare-parts-bin.html

Googling something like "Skywatcher dob milk carton mod" finds quite a few more threads on SGL and elsewhere

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Personally, I think the most important accessory you need, assuming you have eyepieces, is a red torch. Even a cheapo camping headlight with red led will do. Hunting on the ground for dropped scope covers and such, faced with the alternative of losing your night vision if you switch on a light, is not pleasant. Specially if you are observing on grass.

Next, a chair or stool to sit with the dob. It made all the more difference to my stamina when observing.

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Hey Gaz,

I am soon to be getting this dobsonian as well I think. The telrad is a good bet and also perhaps a dew shield made from neoprene. It is less about the dew on the secondary and more about stray light into the focuser, reducing contrast.

I will be very interested to keep an eye on how you are getting on with it all when it arrives. I have turn left at orion and also a cheshire already, they have served me well.

I am aware there is a dob owners group, but perhaps a 200p owners group is also in order? They seem to be very well recieved, bought and modded...

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Telrad is so good I don't need the scope...made a dew shield from neoprene foam(e bay) and it works a treat.I really couldn't find a thing with the finder on my little Celestron,and the Telrad enhanced the pleasure enormously.Go for it.

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Thanks all for your tips and idea's.

The Telrad seems to be a very popular tool, glad i have ordred mine.

I have a small Fenix torch with a red lens cap, for night time use.

I have a very good adjustable chair from a mobility company click here very sturdy and folds flat and with the bar at the bottom of the legs it will not sink into the ground.

I did wonder why a dob needed a dew shield as they are less prone to dew, but as you said it is more about limiting stray light into the focuser, so you get better contrast - very good idea - one of them roll up camping mats will make a good cheap dew/light limiting shield.

I googled the wixey, interesting idea.

@ Ben - i will look into the milk carton modding, thanks.

Dobsonians seem to be overlooked by new people coming into astronomy (i to was going to go for a fancy computerised model) but after reading a few books and asking a few questions i decided that the dob was the perfect scope for a beginner instead of the more high-tech computerised scopes or reflectors on undersized equatorial mounts that are out there, and £ 4 £ you cannot get any better than a dob, they call it a light bucket because it catches so much light.

Gaz

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