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proflight2000

eyepiece recommendation for a newtonian

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Having my skywatcher 200 delivered a week Tuesday, if those pro's amongst you were to have to choose a good eyepiece to go with the scope what would it be. A 10mm and a 20mm come as standard. I suppose the main crux is, at what level would I be stretching the boundaries through the specifications the scope offers. I like crater watching the moon and want to get in as close as possible, also seeing as I have now gone for a bigger light grasp, what eyepiece would be better fitting to get a reasonable view of nebula's etc. Thanks all and lets hope one day that this rain will go and I can at least then go outside with my baader solar paper made eye cups for my binoculars and see the sun.

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I would suggest:

- a nice 2" long EP (more than 30mm) for Milky Way scanning and DSOs

- a high power ortho for good planetary observing.

- a few parfocals (it means you don't have to alter focus interchanging them) in between. Get a nice set of plossls for general viewing. A 25mm and a 10mm should be adequate for now.

- a good 2x barlow to double your collection.

Very nice scope you're getting there. The above selection shouldn't cost much more than £200 and will give you amazing views of anything. If your choices are good, it'll mean you won't need to do much upgrading in the future.

Andrew

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I would suggest adding a good quality 2x Barlow Lens and a 32mm Plossl. Used in combination that would give you magnifcations of 31x 50x 62x 100x and 200x which would keep you going for a while. The 32mm would also give you a reasonably wide field of view which is useful for observing galaxies, nebulae and other "extended" objects. If you wanted to add a further eyepiece something around 7mm would give you 143x and 286x. The latter is about as much power as you can usefully use with the seeing conditions we get in the UK - and that would be on a good night !.

John

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I agree with john.

But, taking it a step further:

Consider the Meade Series 5000 Super Plossls (60 degree FOV).

The 32mm (2"), 20mm (1.25") and the 14mm (1.25") would make a good set.

Add a barlow and you also have a 16mm, 10mm and 7mm. A total of six magnifications, none of which overlap (excluding original eyepieces).

http://www.firstlightoptics.com/products.php?cat=43

The FOV charts shows the three eyepieces on your scope (click to enlarge)

Hope that helps.

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May I add a 17mm it's what get's used a lot in mine.....

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