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Turn left at Orion


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I've had my scope for a few months now and have been really impressed with everything I have seen (planets, moon, Orions Nebula and another Nebula just above Orion that I don't know the name of!), but I think it's about time I found some new objects to look at!

Would the above book be ideal for me or does it only deal with the really small scopes?

Thanks in advance

Mark

Edited by Yidoboy
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Hi Mark, yes it is, in fact I think if we did a pole on astro books it would come out on top!

It is not important how big your scope is, in the book they only use as high as a 4" instrument for their observations but if you have a bigger scope then thats great use it! :rolleyes:

Have you got this free software that is also really helpfull

Stellarium

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Absolutely essential for any beginner. It teaches you how to find your way to many objects with diagrams to show you what you should see in the finderscope along the way and an illustration of what the object looks like in a small scope. I found it really useful as it shows you realistically what you can expect to see, and if you have a bigger scope then you know that the view can only be an enhancement of what is shown. There is also information about each target, so once you have it in view, you can take a few minutes to digest what you are actually looking at.

Rachel

Edited by The Bat
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If you really want to expand your horizons invest in a copy of "Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders", 500 pages packed with information for each Constellation, diagrams, star maps, how to find with pics and explanations of what you can expect to see, from bins through to a medium size scope, covers all Messier a lot of NGC and many others, it comes highly recommended and is the next logical step from TL@O.

John.

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Well I think Turn Left at Orion is it then. I use Stellarium all the time and find that very useful.

I think the library idea is a good plan and I'll give that a shot first.

Edited by Yidoboy
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Somewhere, the author makes a comment about expecting the book to get grass stained and damp pages. Yes, mine did, and is still getting worse. An excellent book. Ideal for grabbing a page relating to time of year and general area of sky available. It covers easy to find objects, right to to really faint DSOs and tightly spaced double/triple stars. All without complex explanations.

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What I great book I have found this to be. I had a copy given to me by a fellow society member and it has definately helped me to see many of the non-naked eye messiers and also several ngc's. It has helped me to identify where these objects are so now I can find many of them without having to refer to a starchart.

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I've ordered a copy from the library. Just waiting for the person who currently has it to bring it back. It's the only copy in the whole of Lancashire Library's collection.

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I think that's decided then! I am also interested in getting hold of a planisphere. I would really like the Phillips version but they seem to be sold out everywhere and are seemingly overpriced on Ebay....has anyone got any other comparative suggestions?

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I think that's decided then! I am also interested in getting hold of a planisphere. I would really like the Phillips version but they seem to be sold out everywhere and are seemingly overpriced on Ebay....has anyone got any other comparative suggestions?

£4.95 inc delivery at Amazon. I paid £5.99 from them a couple of weeks ago.

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Anyone interested in buying this book might be interested to know that, according to the Cambridge University Press website, there will be a 4th edition available from August in spiral bound form.

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Just to add to Snarks observations above. The new 4th edition will also have a section specific to Dobsonian scopes and in recognition of beginners starting off with larger apertures, the target list of objects has also been increased. I would also like to second John's (Glowjet) "Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders" a VERY good book indeed and is worth getting hold of to take you to the next level.

James

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yea great book well worth getting was my first book and my second was the illustrated guide to astro wonders enough targets in them 2 books to keep me busy for years. maybe even decades with our clouds :(

the nebula above orion is the horsehead and flame

star

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