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Betelguese


pss53
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Sorry probably a silly question...

But when this explodes is there a possibility that the force of the blast could send asteroids our way??

I'll be certainly keeping an eye on it when out and about...Imagine viewing it and it explodes...Something probably once in a lifetime opportunity to see...

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Sorry probably a silly question...

But when this explodes is there a possibility that the force of the blast could send asteroids our way??

I'll be certainly keeping an eye on it when out and about...Imagine viewing it and it explodes...Something probably once in a lifetime opportunity to see...

more like once in a billion lifetimes!!:(

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Can someone tell me the correct way of prounouncing betelgeuse - I'm always nervous that I say it wrong: "beetlejuice" and those in the know might think me a bit nebulous...:(

On S@N this month they discussed it, and I think they came to the conclusion there isn't a correct way to pronounce or spell it!

My vote goes for

bay-til-geese

bay as in "Dock of the ..."

til as in till but shorter l on the end

geese as in plural of the bird"

Edited by Stephen
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I tend to avoid pronouncing it as beatle-juice as im concerned what will happen if i say it three times in a row.

Back to the topic posted, the chances of any debris from betelguese and its system hitting us after a 420+ year trip is rather unlikely in my opinion. I do hope that this star novas within my lifetime, would be amazing. Would it severely affect ones ability to observe objects in the orion area? I expect so.

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I tend to avoid pronouncing it as beatle-juice as im concerned what will happen if i say it three times in a row.

Back to the topic posted, the chances of any debris from betelguese and its system hitting us after a 420+ year trip is rather unlikely in my opinion. I do hope that this star novas within my lifetime, would be amazing. Would it severely affect ones ability to observe objects in the orion area? I expect so.

LOL - was thinking that myself about the 'B' word :(

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I tend to avoid pronouncing it as beatle-juice as im concerned what will happen if i say it three times in a row.

Back to the topic posted, the chances of any debris from betelguese and its system hitting us after a 420+ year trip is rather unlikely in my opinion. I do hope that this star novas within my lifetime, would be amazing. Would it severely affect ones ability to observe objects in the orion area? I expect so.

I meant more in terms of pushing other objects off course/out of it's normal orbit so to speak?? Not debris from the planet....

Edited by pss53
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Asteroids as we know them are solar system bodies; the "shockwave" from Betelgeuse if (when) it goes supernova will not really affect anything in our solar system. It will be an impressive sight though!

Would there be a shockwave as space is a vacuum? There isn't any medium (such as air or other fluid) for the wave to go through and waves need something to carry them.

Then again, light is is a wave and that travels through the vaccum of space no problem...

I'd really like to know if anyone has any idea....

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I meant more in terms of pushing other objects off course/out of it's normal orbit so to speak?? Not debris from the planet....

Given the distances involved, I doubt any particles with more mass than Neutrinos could have enough frequency(numbers as opposed to wavelength) and energy to affect anything in our solar system.

The only one to watch out for is Gamma Ray Burst (if that is even applicable in this case,) but that won't knock objects of their orbits. It would more likely just kill every living organism instead leaving everything right where it was!

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Or to put it another way, the sun is kicking out masses of energy, particles etc and it is only 93million miles away. Yet we are not knocked off our orbit. When Betelgeuse goes SN, it won't outshine the sun!

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