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Cannon eos 1000d


kid rok
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What do you want to know?

With a 1.25" (or 2") to T thread adaptor and a T2 camera adaptor it will fit most telescopes. Needs a backfocus of 55mm - some scopes can't get this with the standard focuser...

A remote shutter control TC-80 type is handy to reduce vibration.

More suited to DSO and star fields etc than lunar and planetary (webcams are best at that)

Can be "modded" to improve the sensitivity to Ha - more red in the nebula images...a reasonable DSLR to start with.

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I just wanted to know is it a camera that's bulit well, easy to use like I say I'm just getting in to this so it's a real big learning curve for me but I don't mind that I'm still reading about the forum and the info is brill everyone has being brill with my question as I'm totally new thanks for putting up with me

What do you want to know?

With a 1.25" (or 2") to T thread adaptor and a T2 camera adaptor it will fit most telescopes. Needs a backfocus of 55mm - some scopes can't get this with the standard focuser...

A remote shutter control TC-80 type is handy to reduce vibration.

More suited to DSO and star fields etc than lunar and planetary (webcams are best at that)

Can be "modded" to improve the sensitivity to Ha - more red in the nebula images...a reasonable DSLR to start with.

Edited by kid rok
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Hi,

This is a great DSLR and is good for astro imaging as well. As mentioned before, it is more suited to DSO's and star field images, not so great for planets. you can pick up a cheap webcam that will do the planets well.

It will depend on what scope and mount you use to image with as well, although mounting the camera on a motorised mount with a wide lens will give some stunning wide field images of the sky.

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The 1000d is capable of producing good results, whether used as an Astro cam and as a daylight cam. It's the cheapest in the Canon SLR lineup, although, I saw a rumour (may need a pinch of salt) yesterday that a new version is due shortly, which may help push the price down a bit on the 1000d (hmmm... now there's a thought ...) however if your primary goal is for astro imaging, you can get the camera in body only for even less money.

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I bought a modded 1000D a while ago just for astronomical work.

What impressed me most is that it's quite a compact design compared to my Fuji S5-Pro and a lot lighter. I prefer heavy cameras for photographic work but when you're hanging it off a telescope weight becomes important. Build quality isn't bad either for the price.

The Canon software that comes free with it is also very good and allows full control of the camera from yor PC via a standard USB connection.

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The 1000D (i have one - self moded) is a pretty decent camera... Here are a few of the images I have produced with it...

Unfortunately theres a lot more to Astrophotography than just sticking the camera on the back of a scope .... (which unfortuantely was the impression givien in the recent Stargazing Live Programmes)

Steves book will provide you with a very good insight in to whats involved...

Billy....

Edited by Psychobilly
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When i was deciding which DSLR to buy i narrowed it down to the 1000D and the 450D.

I went into a shop and held both in my hands. The 1000D was very well built. It has just about the same specs as the 450D.

In the end i went for the 450D (even though it was a bit more money) because it felt to me slightly more well built and suited my BIG hands better. It is ever so slightly heavier.

I knew both were GREAT for entry level astro imaging so i really was not worried which one i bought. The 450D just felt more natural in my hands.

I have read so many times here that the best book on AP is "making every Photon count".

Think i'll pick up a copy.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher
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I started off with the family Canon 350D, but that does not have live imaging which made focus a bit of a [removed word]. There were also complaints from the rest of the family that I kept leaving it set up for astro and "in some weird state that I can't use!".

So I went for a body only 1000D, and it has worked very well. At least on the easy targets I have gone for so far. I have started using the APT application for data capture, and find it works extremely well with the Canon.

old_eyes

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