Jump to content

 

1825338873_SNRPN2021banner.jpg.68bf12c7791f26559c66cf7bce79fe3d.jpg

 

Turn left at orion?


Recommended Posts

  • Replies 46
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

hi

Can anyone clarify which edition Amazon uk are currently selling? this is getting confusing reading that folk have received the updated version (tables up to 2020) yet on the website it says that it's the 3 edition (19 Oct 2000) and the 'Look inside' tool shows tables up to 2011 only.

link below to the amazon copy I found which is hardback at £17.23 - is there a paperback version cheaper on the same site? cos I can't find it!

many thanks!

Turn Left at Orion: A Hundred Night Sky Objects to See in a Small Telescope - and How to Find Them: Amazon.co.uk: Guy Consolmagno, Dan M. Davis: Books

Link to comment
Share on other sites

link below to the amazon copy I found which is hardback at £17.23 - is there a paperback version cheaper on the same site? cos I can't find it!

many thanks!

I couldn't find a paperback version either so just bought the hardback which arrived this morning :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi James

The edition I just purchased was the 11th printing (2010) of the 3rd edition (2000). As I said, all data tables have been updated to 2020.

I ordered from Amazon UK on 19th Jan, it arrived within the same week and was as described above.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Are there any similar books but with much more scientific context? Or will have have to write one?

I don't know about similar - if you are travelling to a foreign land there's nothing wrong with a good guide book but it's not going to give you the depth that a history of the country might. Background reading is something else. I've just finished: Planets - A Very Short Introduction, by David A. Rothery. Here's my mini-review:

Rothery is Senior Lecturer in the Open University Department of Earth & Environmental Studies and has been involved in various lunar and martian missions. In a bit over a hundred pages he describes the evolution of the solar system, the geology of the terrestrial planets, structure of the gas giants, satellites and rings, asteroids, trans-Neptunian objects and exo-planets. This is 'popular science' done right, while it doesn't assume much prior knowledge, it doesn't over-simplify or use misleading analogies either. It's from a series of books from the OUP written by experts for non-experts.

For my next read I have copies of:

Galaxies - A Very Short Introduction, John Gribbin

Cosmology - A Very Short Introduction, Peter Coles

I've only skimmed through these two as yet, I'll let you know what I think.

Edited by SimonR
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've just finished: Planets - A Very Short Introduction, by David A. Rothery... I've only skimmed through these as yet, I'll let you know what I think.

I'm a historian and have come across this OUP series before. They are generally quite good considering their difficult brief to combine academic rigour with popular appeal. It hadn't struck me to look at the astronomy related titles - good call. :) I'm keen to hear what you think.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Why not try before you buy, look in your local library, I do. They can order books for you to peruse so you know what you'll be getting.:)

A great idea and a good way to resist this philistine government. Education for all, not just the rich! :)

Edited by D:Ream
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...
Hi James

The edition I just purchased was the 11th printing (2010) of the 3rd edition (2000). As I said, all data tables have been updated to 2020.

Can you tell me the ISBN for this version of the book that you have please? Bit of a myriad of versions out there! but you have the one im looking for. Might be easier to find with correct isbn no.

Thanks :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

TLAO 4th Edition due for publication August 2011.

As per publisher web site Search - Cambridge University Press

Just in time for winter skies - I'll be getting a copy. Although I think the 3rd Edition will still be worth reading/ owning as both with cover slightly different subjects - telescopes used for example. Smaller in the 3rd edition, slightly larger in 4th (due to more people owning larger scopes)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.