Jump to content

Banner.jpg.39bf5bb2e6bf87794d3e2a4b88f26f1b.jpg

Moving the earth


Nick R
 Share

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 35
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

What will We do when this happens in 4 or 5 billion years??

Nothing

What will the intelligent humanoids called the L.Casei Immunitas that evolved from my gut bacteria do in 5 billion years when this happens. Who knows!! :)

Remember all life on earth evolved from an ameoba a mere 3.5 billion years ago. So if the 'we' refered to means humans then its a silly question. It only makes sense if the 'we' refers to any future lifeform that evolved on Earth. Similarily. Imagine Yellowstone blows in 100 years wrecking the environment, the world economy and civilisation. We are back to the stone age. Things get so bad that natural selection means we evolve into a simpler form of primate again. (Evolution doesn't have to be forwards so to speak towards bigger, faster, stronger, more intelligent.) Things pick up in the world again in a million years and we start evolving intelligence again. Even those these creatures evolved from us. Can it be said that they are 'We'.......

Edited by calibos
Link to comment
Share on other sites

By the time we need to change the orbit we would have engineered new bodies that could travel and live in space I should think. We might even be ethereal ie. with no physical body if that's possible. Imagine - a billion years of technological development !?!?!?!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't the Earth's orbit (or any planet's orbit) determined by its mass, its speed and resulting centrifugal force and the mutual gravity between it and the star it orbits? So if we changed the orbit to be further away from the star, would we not also need to change its orbital speed to keep it in a stable orbit?

BTW, that reminds me of that silly Earth Jump Day a few years back... :)

Edited by yesyes
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Isn't the Earth's orbit (or any planet's orbit) determined by its mass, its speed and resulting centrifugal force and the mutual gravity between it and the star it orbits? So if we changed the orbit to be further away from the star, would we not also need to change its orbital speed to keep it in a stable orbit?

BTW, that reminds me of that silly Earth Jump Day a few years back... :)

Yes. In fact from what I've heard it's by speeding it up that the orbit would move further out.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

No, that's not how it works. Increasing the Earth's orbital velocity would push the Earth out of orbit or into an eccentric and possibly unstable orbit. Orbital velocity is the square root of GM/r . Therefore as radius increases, the velocity decreases by the inverse square. For example, Venus orbits at 35,000 m/s, Earth at just under 30,000 m/s and Mars at just over 24,000 m/s. The idea that placing an asteroid in front of the Earth would speed it up is laughable nonsense, since the mutual gravitational attraction would soon result in a collision.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.