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newbie EQ mount question


Herishi
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If the title hasnt scared everybody off I have a question, it seems that part a in the pic below is able to move freely while the scope is stationary and also sometimes stays still when I am moving the scope about that axis.

The part marked b moves with the scope about that axis as I would expect.

Is this correct operation?

Also I think I maybe missing something buy I cant work out how the 2" adapter fits the scope, however I have nothing that uses the 2" adapter so I have plenty of time to sort this.

Thanks for all you help

Steve

post-23617-133877523443_thumb.jpg

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Having another look it seems that parts A and B both move independently to the axis they measure:icon_scratch:

Also if you see the pic below the "ring" part of the gauge doesnt seem to be fitted correctly!

Am I just being really stupid?

:)

post-23617-133877523486_thumb.jpg

Edited by Herishi
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Hi Steve, my scope mount is just the same so I assume its normal!

Thats the setting circle for RA, the screw above it is to lock it off.

Do you know how to use the setting circles, as once aligned you can look up the RA & Dec coordinates of any object (DSO for instance) & move the scope to the coordinates via the setting circles & voila you should see said object.

PS. I haven;t worked it out or tried thsi yet :)

Chris

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Yes, A moves with the mount in RA unless the locking screw is tight. B always moves.

A millimeter gap is the same as I have.

You can forget about these rings if you Google some software called Polarfinder and use that. it makes polar alignment very easy.

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Thanks, I kinda understand how it all works but the "dials" for want of a better word are so loose and in consistent regardless or if the screw at the top's position that they could not be used for any kind of scientific measurement,

maybe they are for astrology????:)

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If your polar scope has been calibrated, then with A locked in place, you rotate the RA axis until the date (on :) lines up with the time (on A) assuming that you have A set to the zero position. Your polar scope should then show you where Polaris is relative to the pole on that date/time.

To use the setting circle, you need to find a known star to calibrate on and you need a set of coordinates for that star. With the scope focused on the star, you unlock A using the screw and dial in the coordinates on the RA axis. Leaving A unlocked you swing the scope until the coordinates shown then match those of your chosen object, and you should be somewhere in the right ball park. I don't find them hugely accurate. The dials are a bit loose, the graduations are not fine enough and it also depends on how accurate your polar alignment is. I learned how to use the circles, and they can be helpful if you are star hopping across a tricky bit of sky, just to get you in the right area, but I probably haven't used them in 2 years.

Rachel

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I agree, I find that the scale is so hard to align accurately with the reference marks that I have never trusted it.

As I say, I use Polarfinder. It shows you on the computer screen a picture of what you should see through the polarfinder. Then just make reality match the picture.

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Cheers guys

I feel better now I realise people hardly use these, I dont have a polar scope yet but plan on getting one soon, well as soon as my credit card has cooled down from buying the scope :-)

Steve

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