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Using a DSLR to capture images


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I've just bought my first ever scope - a Celestron NexStar 127 SLT. I still have had no luck with aligning it but that's another story. Now with the 9mm & 25mm supplied eye pieces the moon looks amazing. I'd love to be able to get something similar looking through my Nikon DSLR. But of course I have to remove the eye piece to fit the Nikon mounting kit to the tube and then I lose all the magnification and the live view through the camera looks just dull and far away. Can I get something to give me magnification through the DSLR? Apologies if this is a real noob question.:D

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The Nexstar127 has a focal length of 1500mm (the same telescope as the Skywatcher 127). With the camera body attached using a t-ring and adaptor the moon will be approxiamately 13mm in diameter on the camera sensor. To increase your magnification you will need a barlow lens which will increase the focal length of the telescope. The Celestron omni 2x barlow or the Tal 3x barlow would be a good choice. This Field of View calculator will give you an impression of the magnification and field of view you can achieve with your camera and a barlow lens. Selesct your camera from the pull-down menu on the right and the telescope (Skywatcher Skymax 127) on the left and then select the moon from the objects menu below.

Peter

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Peter, cheers for the advice, and what an awesome site that link was to!:D

Can I presume you just fit the Barlow lens (screw on?) to the end of the camera adapter?

Thanks again.

Peter

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There are some barlows that have a suitable t-thread that screws onto the t-ring. For most barlows you will need the t-adaptor like this one. The nose piece of the adaptor goes into the top of the barlow and the threaded end screws into the t-ring.

Peter

I seem to be having a senior moment as I'm still a tad unsure of what I need to do. My camera set up is a Nikon t-ring connected to my camera body and a t-adapter screwed onto that. This I then place into the 90 degree diagonal in place on my eye piece. When I buy my Barlow (I'll order tomorrow) that will fit to the front of the t-adapter but I still may need a t-ring? Oh the joys of being a complete noob.:)

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It may not be the route you want to go but you can get some decent images using afocal or eyepiece projection and you get the benefit of snapping EXACTLY what you are seeing because they both use an eyepiece.

Interesting...any more info?

cheers

Peter

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Interesting...any more info?

cheers

Peter

follow the link in my sig, I have tried to make it as clear as possible on the site because it certainly confused the heck out of me when I started.

With deep sky stuff you want the minimum amount of glass between the sensor and the object but for planets and lunar stuff you can get very good results by allowing glass in the way.

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I've got my dslr connected directly to the focuser of my 4" refractor, but I need an extension tube to achieve focus, hopefully it should be arriving tomorrow; unfortunately though, we have a lot of cloud forecast until next thursday where I live! :-(

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