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Neeklaus

First objects to look at

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Hello there!

First post here. I've been reading threads and articles since I joined...great stuff. I've learned a lot.

I was wondering if anyone has compiled of list of highlights to look for with a telescope for someone new to the hobby?

In other words, Ialist of fairly easy to locate and rewarding sights to get a taste of the star gazing hobby.

thanks ahead of time!

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hello there are many things to look at. i am new to this myself and im still learning "turn left at orion" is a great book to read. as for what to look at you have the messier objects,the planets jupiter is about in the everning and venus in the morning. there is so much to look at and im sure someone with a lot more knoledge than me will be along soon.

if you dont have it yet try downloading stellarium its a great little program for whats about in the sky and its free :)

as for me my first non planet to view will be m42 the orion nebular when i get a clear night. hope this helps a little but like i said im still new to this

happy hunting. star

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hi neeklaus.

the first and most obvious thing to start off on is the moon. but you will have to be up early in the morning to see it.

the second would be jupiter, a nice bright object in the southern sky

the third would be orion and the orion nebula

the fouth would be m45 in taurus (the seven sisters)

the fith would be venus, an early morning object in the south east sky (the moon is not to far away to see them both )

i would advise not to image the sun without due care and safety

alas for me thats about it (two wacking stupid street lights out side my back garden spoils the seeing for any thing fainter)

Edited by astropete

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I got a telescope for Christmas and so far I've seen a very small Saturn (I could see its rings!) and the Moon. I tried looking at Jupiter but it was just a big white ball, no detail whatsoever.

I didn't get a very good telescope, my parents wanted to make sure i enjoyed looking at the sky before spending serious money on a telescope.

I'm still very happy!

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Hi Neeklaus, I'm new to this as well and I echo what star_chaser said about "Turn Left at Orion". Also try Sky at Night magazine, there is much in it.

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Hi and welcome. I would agree with astropete mostly. Some fine objects to look at. Highlight in the evening sky at the moment has to be jupiter and its moons. Check it out towards the east. Saturn around as well in the morning if you get out of bed. This is in my opinion the best thing to look at through a telescope..amazing. Finally I would add to astropete's list the andromeda galaxy. There is soming quick cool about seeing our nearest neighbouring galaxy a mere 2.5 million light year away. That means that it's taken 2 and a half milion years for that light to reach your eyes.

Enjoy!

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Hi Neeklaus - if you get either Sky at Night magazine, or Astronomy Now magazine, they both have a center page pull out with a map of the current monthly sky and a list of interesting objects to look at. They also describe how to find the objects for the month and what type of equipment to use.

Over the length of a year you can pick up quite a nice repertoire of objects and have a greater understanding of how the constellations and stars move accross the sky according to season.

I also second the idea to get Turn Left at Orion, and "Stellarium".

Cheers :)

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Hi Neeklaus, a very warm welcome to the forum, once you have had a look at the most obvious targets you will want to expand your observing, apart from the other literature mentioned treat yourself to a copy of "Observing the Deep Sky" by Darren Bushnall, 175 page paperback, this will set you back 10p from Amazon £2.75 with postage, covers much of the basics then leads you into some of the popular DSO and how to sketch what you see, not bad value for just over the cost of a pint of beer.

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I was wondering if anyone has compiled of list of highlights to look for with a telescope for someone new to the hobby?

Sure, google "beginner astronomy targets" and you will find several.

Sky and Telescope magazine has a weekly highlights article that lists things of interest. It's for US latitudes, so a few items may not work for more Northern regions, but most will.

Here's a list of easy beginner objects, sorted by season and with notes on how to find them. It should give you some good first targets to build up your skills.

Best of luck,

- Richard

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Sorry to Hijack the thread!

alas for me thats about it (two wacking stupid street lights out side my back garden spoils the seeing for any thing fainter)

How bad do you find the light pollution? I haven't bought a scope yet, but one of the considerations I have to take into account is I have a street light pointing into my garden and I initially thought this would ruin any chance I have of viewing anything.

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A street light in close proximity won't help, that's for sure, but it's still possible to get decent views. You might want to choose filters carefully.

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I got a telescope for Christmas and so far I've seen a very small Saturn (I could see its rings!) and the Moon. I tried looking at Jupiter but it was just a big white ball, no detail whatsoever.

I didn't get a very good telescope, my parents wanted to make sure i enjoyed looking at the sky before spending serious money on a telescope.

I'm still very happy!

Dear Napoleon,

I suggest you learn about all the different kinds of objects that are 'out there', their sizes relative to us and each other, how each type develop, how they are all connected ie. how they all developed from hydrogen atoms (which is what the universe consisted of originally). Tell your parents that all this richness (including themselves) came from hydrogen plus lots & lots of time and how many of those wonders can be appreciated and watched as they change in a good telescope so they can buy you one ! :(

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Unless you live in the middle of a big field in the middle of nowhere or on top of a mountain a light pollution filter really is a great help. Flo sell a Skywatcher light pollution filter for £30 and it really is GOOD.

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Hi Napoleon,

I think that if you can see the rings of Saturn, even though they may be a bit fuzzy, you would easily see the four Gallileian moons of Jupiter. If you use your Stellarium program you will see where they are in relation to the planet. Show them to you parents, they might be interested and it will demonstrate your interest, and that you are also learning something from having a telescope.

Also, keep reading stuff in this forum and elsewhere, and learn the constellations.

Enjoy your hobby.

Best wishes,

Bob

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One that hasn't been mentioned that I think is a really good beginner target is the double cluster NGC 869 and 884.

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Hi Napoleon,

I think that if you can see the rings of Saturn, even though they may be a bit fuzzy, you would easily see the four Gallileian moons of Jupiter. If you use your Stellarium program you will see where they are in relation to the planet. Show them to you parents, they might be interested and it will demonstrate your interest, and that you are also learning something from having a telescope.

Also, keep reading stuff in this forum and elsewhere, and learn the constellations.

Enjoy your hobby.

Best wishes,

Bob

Well no need to learn them all at once. You will come to learn them over the yrs simply by repetitive observing, but to find your way around the sky at ANY time of year certainly learn 3-4 of the main ones that appear each season. One in the north,south,east and west would be great..........depending on how much of the sky is available from your location.

Keep reading this form and DONT be afraid to ask questions...........................as stupid as you may think they are. The only stupid question is the question that you dont ask.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher

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Unless you live in the middle of a big field in the middle of nowhere or on top of a mountain a light pollution filter really is a great help. Flo sell a Skywatcher light pollution filter for £30 and it really is GOOD.

Luke,

I've never used a light pollution filter, can you see fainter stars with the filter than you would normally be able to see, or is it only nebulae that are improved ?

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A light pollution filter is designed only to block out certain types of man made light. The Skywatcher LPF i have eliminates the horrible orange glow from street lights. The dark sky becomes darker..............i.e~~~contrast is improved.

I have put my LPF to the test by aiming it directly between 2 street lights (30 feet away) and the glow was almost non-existent and i could see stars right between the street lights.

You wont see fainter stars per say but you will see more stars that had previously been invisible due to light pollution.

Edited by LukeSkywatcher

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hey im new too, i started looking at the moon, jupiter, then m42 "orion nebula". it took me 2 nights to find them all in one go lol.

clear skys!

Alex

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Another GOOD filter to have is a Moon filter. It takes the brightness out of the moon when it is nearing full. Its not essential but when you look at the Moon for the first time through a scope it can be VERY blinding. It wont do ANY damage to your eye(s), but it makes observing the Moon more comfortable. You can buy them online for about £12.

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