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Jupiter 6th December


lukebl
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Not many postings of Jupiter recently. Is it the weather?

Here's my effort from this evening through the fog, although I just can't seem to get a really sharp image, even though my collimation is spot on. I suspect it is bad seeing caused by the heat rising from the housing estate to the south of me.

SPC900 webcam, 5x Telextender, 250mm f/4.8 Newt. 1400 frames, stacked in Registax. There seems to be a dark streak now along the equatorial edge of the SEB.

lukebl-albums-luke-s-help-images-picture7975-jupiter-2010-12-06.jpg

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Thanks for the positive comments, guys.

I just wonder if I'll ever be able to get the much greater level of sharpness that others manage to achieve in their images (even with Newtonians and webcams), or whether I'm limited by either by my equipment, or my seeing conditions? I would have thought my 250mm Newt could do a bit better than this. Perhaps the seeing here in inland East Anglia is worse than ,say, a coastal site, as some of you coastal members seem to consistently get some really good images?

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Thanks for the positive comments, guys.

I just wonder if I'll ever be able to get the much greater level of sharpness that others manage to achieve in their images (even with Newtonians and webcams), or whether I'm limited by either by my equipment, or my seeing conditions? I would have thought my 250mm Newt could do a bit better than this. Perhaps the seeing here in inland East Anglia is worse than ,say, a coastal site, as some of you coastal members seem to consistently get some really good images?

Nice lmage Luke.

My advice is fairly simple. Keep trying, don't be discouraged by ordinary results. Not much you can do about the seeing, but the practice will make a difference, and will allow you to take a better shot if the seeeing ever comes good.

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Nice lmage Luke.

My advice is fairly simple. Keep trying, don't be discouraged by ordinary results. Not much you can do about the seeing, but the practice will make a difference, and will allow you to take a better shot if the seeeing ever comes good.

Thanks for that, Clayton. The thing is, I've been practicing for nearly two years now and seem to have reached a plateau! Not sure if it's down to continuous bad seeing, my lack of ability, or deficiency in my equipment. I just would have thought a 250mm Newt could to better.

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Hi Luke,

I haven't really started "proper" imaging through my 10" Newt yet, but I'd be over the moon to get a result as good as this!

Regarding your search for the limiting factor in getting the results you aspire to, you could consider giving your raw data to someone who's images you respect, to see whether they can produce a similar or better result to you with the processing. This would at least eliminate this element and may narrow your search.

Kevin

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Many thanks again, gents.

An amazing amount of detail there using a webcam. How is the newt mounted, is it driven and guide cammed?

The scope was on a driven EQ6 mount, not guide cammed.

I still think, though, that I should be getting more detail, even with a Newt, but maybe I'm being greedy after seeing what people are acheiving with C8s, C11s, C14s, etc, and under Australian skies!

Edited by lukebl
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Hi Luke,

That's a fine image. I hope you don't mind, but I took the liberty of playing around with the processing. The following is a result of of using a great little program called focus magic, which works either as a standalone or as a plugin for photoshop. (Recover Detail and Sharpen Your Blurred Photos) I then just fiddled with levels and curves in photoshop to enhance it a bit:

luke-jupiter.jpg

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The reedit is a little too sharp IMHO. Though there is some more detail I think it starts to look more like a computer graphic than a photo if you take the processing too far.

@ OP: To get a better capture you could try moving your kit to a 'dark' spot if you think your location is limiting you. To be honest I think you're scope aperture resolution limited. Is anyone producing better images than you with a 250mm Newt? All the really good planet images I see are done with large SCTs like C-14s and such. Theres no substiitute for large aperture when it comes to resolving extremely small details such as a planets surface detail.

Edited by bus_ter
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Though there is some more detail I think it starts to look more like a computer graphic than a photo if you take the processing too far.

Point taken - it's always a matter of reaching a balance between sharpness of detail and a "natural" looking image. You're certainly right about resolution and aperture: Nothing one does will reveal detail smaller than the dawes limit for any particular scope.

BTW, bus_ter, I notice you have the same scope/camera as me. Have you had any Jupiter images lately? I have only had a few imaging sessions and have yet to get the best out of it. I know that the mak 127 can produce great results. Unfortunately the lousy weather has put paid to any more sessions for now. :)

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Thanks for the comments. I like my images to be a little more subdued, so I try not to overdo the processing. In this case onion rings appear pretty quickly once you start over-doing it.

.... To get a better capture you could try moving your kit to a 'dark' spot if you think your location is limiting you...

No way! This lot isn't going anywhere:

lukebl-albums-luke-s-help-images-picture7610-lukes-soft-top-obsy.jpg

If it is down to the location, I guess I'll just have to put up with it.

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Luke. You don't need a dark site for most planetary imaging. Your setup should be capable of better, but may be hampered by poor seeing, collimation, optics, or focus.

Thanks Clayton. Going through the list:

Seeing: Awful

Collimation: OK

Optics: Probably OK

Focus: OK

Looks like it's probably the seeing, then. Which may, or may not, be made worse by my location. I think I need to see what others are acheiving with an SW250 and webcam. Mind you, I believe your images are done with a 200 (?), and I recall a very nice one you did of Jupiter which was a lot sharper than mine.

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You are probably correct about the seeing Luke. I would rate seeing as the most important factor for myself. Have you tried different Barlows? I have three, and one of them is much better than the other two.

I have a 200mm f6 Newtonian in a suburban backyard. I'm still waiting for a night of really great seeing. It usually ranges between 4-7/10 with one night I would have called 8/10 and a few 7.5/10's The reason I mentioned persistence earlier on was that my shots from a year ago were not that great, to the point that I didn't really wish to continue unless I could do better. I really thought I was at the limit of my setup. Fortunately, every now and then I made small advances, but the weird thing is that I don't really know what I am doing differently? I think it's like many things where the more you do it the better you get at it.

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