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9x50 finder scope....just not sure


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Had an hour or 2 thursday night with the Dob until the cloud came in, nice views of Jupitar and moon (before it got to high and made night like day) and as Orion's belt came higher i set out to find the nebular, easy to find middle star of the belt come down in a straight line middle of the next 3 stars.....yeah right, i really struggled with the finder scope, i have always used a red dot finder, easy so maybe just not use to the 9x50 for example with my eyes i can see the target when i go to use the finder to get on it it of course shows more stars and is all reversed up/down/left/right etc, i think my main problem is i'm still learning my way around the night sky and like i said just so use to a red dot, so what i'm looking at is to buy a Telrad but will this fit in the Skywatcher finder scope shoe? or do i need some sort of adapter? or can anyone give me any tips of using the 9x50?

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If it is a straight through one, try keeping both eyes open when looking through it. I find it helps you in locating the brighter stars in the FOV. Assuming it is properly aligned you get the naked eye image superimposed over the view through the finder complete with crosshairs, just get the naked eye star lined up with them and it should hopefully be within the FOV.

I hope that my instructions are clear and that it helps if you aren't already trying this :)

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The Telrads I've seen have been held on with a couple of strips of velcro and dob users do swear by them. A little more expensive but worth considering is a right angled correct image finder scope. I use the Orion 9x50 raci all the time with no probs and they fit directly onto a skywatcher shoe :)

Edited by brantuk
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Hi Dave,

When you buy a new Telrad it comes with its own holder which you simply just stick onto the OTA with the adhesive pads.

The Telrad does not attach to the 9x50 shoe :)

(sorry, beaten to the post, if you're not fast you're last)

Edited by callisto
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Thanks for the quick replys folks, Hypernova, i did only use one eye:rolleyes: so will try what you have said.

Brantuk, yeah always reading from fellow Dob users about the Telrad so looks like my next buy, also looked into the right angle type but for now i cope ok looking up the tube, and of course xmas coming up and kids wanting presents...

Callisto, thanks for that bit of info just what i needed to know,

can't stop have a Telrad to order:D

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I want to also add that I do have a Telrad mounted to the side of my regular finder which I use occasionally to get me into the right area, I will then use the 9x50 finder to take me from there by being able make out fainter star hopping guide stars.

I prefer this method than using the Telrad on it's own and using the position of the circle to track down fainter deep sky objects. This is because there are quite a few objects in sparse areas of the sky where a rdf would be no use.

I have been planning to get a RACI finder to help with the neck craning problem of the straight through one. With this a Telrad would be necessary because I find it hard to line up a RA finder as I cannot look at the sky where I am pointing. As I said before I'd use a Telrad to get to a bright star and go from there with the optical finder.

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I didnt find the telrad much use as I couldnt see enough faint stars through it due to light pollution so use a home made 8 X 40 now which is ideal as it has 7.5 degree field of view and shows stars down to mag 8 easily. I suppose a telrad is good if you have a wide field low power eyepiece for your scope but as I only have a .73 degree as my lowest power I need a finderscope.

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Another thing i should mention is i was using my 25mm ep to hunt the targets, now i believe something with less power would be better for deep space, i have now bought me a 32mm ep, will this help with my deep space hunting?

I have found since buying the Telrad and 32mm EP together I can line up approximately with the Telrad and the target is probably 75% of the time within the field of view, depends on the FOV of your EP and how accurately you line up with the Telrad.

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all reversed up/down/left/right etc

If it's a straight-through finder then the view is inverted but not left/right reversed, i.e. it's just like the view through the main scope. If you're using a star map then you turn it to the direction that matches the view (if looking due south this will mean turning the map upside-down). Just takes a little practice.

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Another thing i should mention is i was using my 25mm ep to hunt the targets, now i believe something with less power would be better for deep space, i have now bought me a 32mm ep, will this help with my deep space hunting?

I use i) a Telrad, ii) a 9x50 right angle finder and iii) a 40mm, 70 degree FoV eyepiece as my finding tools on my 10" newtonian. I rarely need all 3 though and most of the time just the Telrad and the 40mm eyepiece do the trick - the 40mm gives a true field of view that is just a little larger than the middle ring projected by the Telrad, which is very handy :)

Edited by John
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Same here. Just telrad, careful alignment (using what I see on the atlas with a telrad overlay) and 90% of the time it's on my 31mm EP (2.12º FoV).

I do use the 9x50 RACI optical finder when there are no bright starts anywhere near the telrad's circles, but that doesn't happen often under skies with 5.5+ limiting mag.

Edited by pvaz
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i found the 9x50 raci(orion)the best purchase i made,i have a telrad also mounted on my dob,this gets me in the right area then the finder is like fine tuning,and with the raci finder everything is the right way up:p

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I have always struggled with RDF's ,

one reason being I am short sighted and hate having to put my glasses on to use it otherwise I cannot see the stars at all !

For me optical finders win every time.

One problem with a right angled finder is that you will only be able to use it with one eye during approximation

rather than using the two eyed method with a straight through finder.

Another point to bear in mind is that unless you have a high spec finder and mount it will need regular calibration with your scope.

Many of the inexpensive finders (plastic) can soon go out of line with the slightest knock.

I have always done a daylight check on my reflectors before a nights viewing

Paul

Edited by Polar Bear
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For finding moon, planets or bright stars, a tip is to get as near as you can by looking along the top of the scope, then simply remove the eyepiece from the main scope. You'll see the object brightly reflected in the primary (or its glare from out-of-field) and can quickly steer it to the centre. I use this method when aligning a finder that has been knocked well out of place. I've always managed with just a straight-through finder and a decent star-map on every scope I've owned - can't think how else you can star-hop using stars fainter than naked eye. But each to their own.

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Thanks for all the help guys, it really has give me a lot to think about, will give it another go tonight, with both eyes open and also thinking of going with the telrad and 9x50 side by side method, i think i just need to use the 9x50 more and get use to it

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