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Clockwork Mount


sbooder
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Hi All,

I was talking to my Uncle a while back, and he was telling me about his first commercial EQ mount he bought back in the early 50s, which was clockwork. He says it was surprisingly accurate.

I was just wondering if any of you are using one, or if are they still produced?

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The older observatory instruments all used clockwork ... in the 1960s and 1970s the fashion was for AC synchronous motors; stepper types "won" because of the capability to run at different rates & rapid slew, but not until microcontrollers became cheap enough to make them practical. (Don't forget the microprocessor wasn't invented until 1971!)

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Old observatory mounts used to be driven by cranking a set of weights. There's no reason a clockwork mount shouldn't work, but the risk is it will lose time as the coil unwinds.

Now what would be really useful is if somebody could invent a clockwork drive for the EQ1!

Edited by Dangerous-Dave
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Right up till the late 50s early 60s Unitron were producing drives using the old clockwork mechanism driven by weights much like a grandfather clock. The victorian drives ala Cooke were works of art in themselves, weights, pulleys, whirling governors fantastic. If someone starts making them afgain let me know:)

Philj

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