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What did you look at first with your first telescope?


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As I said in another post my first telescope will arrive sometime tommorow and I was wondering what would be a good test for the telescope, and was also wondering what the rest of you first looked at? My thoughts were simply to find something with my binocs that looked interesting and zoom in with the tele just to get an idea of what it could do, however I am open to suggestions.

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In my case it was Saturn but that might be difficult! I'd go to Jupiter and the Moon first, too.

But the first thing I remember 'seeing,' funnily enough, was not the object itself but the spin of the Earth as it moved across the EP. For some reason that really got to me in a thrilling way.

Olly

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Saturn was my first object in the telescope (after the moon in binocs) - will never forget that first jaw dropping moment. But saturn was available that night - for you it would be Jupiter at the moment. Still an amazing first sight. The moons a bit bright right now but you'll still enjoy that too - filter recommended.

Becoming aware of the earths rotation was another eurka moment as Olly mentions above. Feels right wierd when you realise we're standing on a spinning rock in the middle of the vastness of space.

Didn't know what to look for next - that's where Stellarium and the Sky at Night came in very useful. Try the months recommended objects in SaN. Of course - you'll have to wait for the right weather at your location - have fun :icon_salut:

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Try looking with your Binos around and below Cassiopeia around midnight. There are a couple of star clusters quite close to Cassiopeia and a lovely double cluster as you scan down towards Mirphak. I can't see them with the naked eye but with 10x50 binos I can just make them out and that helps me locate them in my main scope as it's finderscope (9x50 Orion) has the same FOV.

The Pleiades are also a lovely sight at the moment though they may be a bit washed out due to the moon's glare over the next couple of days.

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Well as i only been out 3 times with my scope (clouds) my first was the moon, that had my jaw dropping just to see the craters so close, then Jupitar, that just got me hooked and i want more and more now, but what really got me is how fast the earth moves, once i had Jupitar in the scope nice and centre went to show my son and he says "where" look again and its moved!...thank god for slow motion control

Edited by bcfcciderhead
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Not sure what size of scope you are getting, but if a largeish aperture then some of the easier size deep sky objects are nice. Ring nebula is easy to find and nice to see. If smallish aperture and particulary at the moment, then the moon is nice as is Jupiter.

If it arrives in the next few days, and the skies are clear, don't look for dim objects as the moon will wash them out. I know as a recent newbie how frustrating it can be to look and not find but when the conditions are right, I can be out there for hours.

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I don't really remember what I looked at first with the telescope, I do remember scanning around the sky on the first night that I got it and finding M42 totally by accident and just being totally blown away by it. I felt like I had just discovered it for the first time ever (I had never seen any photos of it previous to this)

The night was so clear and seeing conditions were really good, the detail that the 8" Dob showed was fantastic, I went running around the house trying to get my family out to look at it, they didnt seem to excited, well it was 1.30am and about -6c. :icon_salut:

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Well I was lucky with my 130mm it was Saturn, now I have the 200p I'm waiting for it to return to our skies.

Jupiter will be your best target, and of course the Moon, but it's extremely bright at present so Moon filters are essential to see any real detail.

Not sure what size scope you have arriving?

So I won't comment on any DSO's.

Ray

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