Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Where do I go from here?


Recommended Posts

I've been using my dob since I got it, but I don't know where to go from here.

I need to learn to navigate the sky better (even with stellarium its difficult for me), to do this I'm most probably going to get the wixey inclinometer to help me, and when the chance comes make a simple setting circle.

I'd like to try finding nebulae and star clusters but I am clueless with where to begin.

My main approach is finding a bright star and looking up stellarium to see what it is. My problem is with identifying constellations, there are a lot of stars and I find it hard to make them out. The other night I found Altair bt couldn't make out the Aquila constellation :s

I only have the stock 10mm and 25mm.

Advice??

Edited by coffee_prince
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Simple book of constellations.

Details of what is in the constellations.

2 eyes.

Set of binoculars for the hell of it.

My advice for a book is The Monthly Sky Guide.

It gives a constellation of the month - nice prominent high one. The constellation detail gives what in the way of DSO's are in it, and hence where in relation to the main stars.

Get outside and start picking the constellatons out:

Plough, Casseiopia, Orion (in a while)

Then when you have located/identified one or two take a peek through the binoculars and see if anything appears - just slight smudges as a rule.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have some ebooks I could probably read, I can pick out some constellations like cassopeia but most give me a headache.

My garden is also south facing, it means I can't see the poole star and constellations like draco in that area :icon_salut: In fact my view from my garden is terrible but I make do with what I got!

Am I also right in that constellations appear upside to what they look like on stellarium? Thats another issue for me

Edited by coffee_prince
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just posted this on another thread:

I used to try and find as many targets in a night as possible but found I was constantly moving about. now I tend to find the constellation that's best positioned and try and locate all the targets in that constellation. I use Illustrated Guide to Astronomical Wonders - first impressions which is excellent for this. run out of targets and work on the next best positioned constellation - simples! this is also a great thread for this Object list indexed by constellation

I do like the Lunar 100 list too Useful Lunar 100 List and of course if a planet is well position eg Jupiter now, I cannot resist. in other words, I'm back where I started - looking at lots of different things.:icon_salut:

unless very lucky most people have a restricted view of one kind of another but don't worry you'll get plenty of targets to find once you get the hang of it. the main obvious brights stars such as Vega, Arcturus, the Cass W and Ursa Major all help as signposts and pointers to other constellations. the book , turn left at Orion is great for getting you into this. I cannot stress enough how much a Telrad and a right angled finder helps with this

Edited by Moonshane
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My garden is also south facing, it means I can't see the poole star and constellations in that area :( In fact my view from my garden is terrible but I make do with what I got!

Am I also right in that constellations appear upside to what they look like on stellarium? Thats another issue for me

South facing garden is good, always lots to see !

I've never done it, but, you don't need Polaris, I'm sure some one on here can explain 'drift alignment'

Also, I'm pretty rubbish at finding my way about, get yourself a copy of 'Turn left at Orion' it helps no end. :icon_salut:

Nope, Stellarium is the right way up, take your PC and monitor outside and set Stellarium to night mode (13th icon from left at bottom of screen shaped like an eye) to preserve your night vision.

Then turn on constellation lines , labels and art.

I usually also turn on show planets and show planet orbits also.

keep trying, you'll get there

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the encouragement everyone!

I have turn left at orion somewhere, I bought it long ago but haven't read it :S

A right angled finderscope sounds great, and maybe even an erecting prism that orientates everything correctly? Unfortunately they are both quite expensive :icon_salut:

I think that was one problem, when I saw something in the sky and then looked through the finder or telescope, it looked all different!

Edited by coffee_prince
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the more you try, the easier it gets, is the principle at work here - it's not just you, everyone has to go up the learning curve.

No one ever goes on line to announce "I was out last night and couldn't find anything!" that's why we only read success stories. LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like to think of it as learning your way around a new town or city if you get out often and see as much of it as possible you'll soon know where most things are if you don't then you won't. Get a planisphere and a pair of binos and get out under the stars, you don't really need your telescope for this, just lie out and learn all the constellations visible from your location. In no time at all you should be able to identify 20 or so. With the bins you can spot many of the Messier objects and also many NGC objects, make notes on how to find them and then when you use the telescope you can refer to these and easily locate them. Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks for the encouragement everyone!

I have turn left at orion somewhere, I bought it long ago but haven't read it :S

A right angled finderscope sounds great, and maybe even an erecting prism that orientates everything correctly? Unfortunately they are both quite expensive :icon_salut:

I think that was one problem, when I saw something in the sky and then looked through the finder or telescope, it looked all different!

a right angled finderscope like the orion 9x50 raci corrects the image to the right way up the ci stands for corrected image.the one i,ve just mentioned is a great finder which funnily enough moonshane advised me on and he was spot on:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Coffee - as the stars go round polaris the constellations appear to be in gradually changing orientations all through the night. Use fast forward in Stellarium to illustrate this - better still get outside for 4-5 hrs - watch cassiopia and it will become obvious.

Learning the constellations will help - but you only need to learn what's currently in the sky on any given day. Over a year you can identify any new ones as they appear.

Eventually you'll gain a full repertoire. As each constellation appears, read up the main objects within them and try spotting them in the dob. A raci may help if you really can't get used to the view in the scope. Binocs are also good for learning the brighter objects. :icon_salut:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I purchased the 'Philips Astro Box' off Fleabay for about £9 inc postage the other month. It's very much a worthwhile purchase, helped me a lot.

You get a very good plastic Planisphere, a book entitled "Stargazing with a Telescope" which shows you how to set-up and use the scope, planisphere & star charts. Also another book entitled "Starfinder" which shows the planets, stars & contellations month by month. Finally there's also a large scale fold-out (map sized) Star Chart.

philips astro box items - Get great deals on Books, Comics Magazines, Photography items on eBay UK!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Coffee_Prince,

I know how you feel, we both have similar scopes, same eyepieces and the same problem.

I'm slowly getting there, but boy is it hard work. I've found that becuase the stock finder magifies by x6, it shows a lot of things that aren't visible to the naked eye; this then confuses me even more and I get totally disorientated.

Another cheap solution worth looking into is the addition of a green laser, I purchased a cheap one for £8.50 from Fleabay. I can't afford the mount this month, but fully intend on getting one. At the moment I've attached the laser with two elastic bands in the groove between the finder mount and the focuser.

astronomy laser items - Get great deals on Consumer Electronics, Sporting Goods items on eBay UK!

It's truly superb, when I've found the object I'm interested in with my eye's, I press the laser button whilst rotating the scope to roughly aline things, then I zero in on the object using my finder - It's so quick, it's made things a lot easier for me.

However I can't starhop for love nor money - LOL

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.