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Hi,

I'm keen on observing asteroids, and I noticed on Calsky that Asteroid 409 Aspasia (a new one for me) was at opposition on Wednesday night.

After inputting the data into Stellarium, I noticed that coincidentally it was skimming past a really nice little barred spiral galaxy (11th Magnitude NGC7479, also a new one for me) this very night. Here's my effort at imaging it. Despite the moon's low altitude, it was bloomin bright and affected the exposures somewhat!

Anyway, it's 30 x 3 minute exposures at ISO 1800 on a Canon 450d at prime focus on a SW200, and shows how much Aspasia moved in an hour and a half. Not brilliant, but interesting, I thought. Stacks of faint galaxies in the whole field of the original image (don't think they'll show up here). Please excuse the blip half way through. A cloud probably went over whilst I was having a quick G n' T.

lukebl-albums-luke-s-help-images-picture6714-aspasia1.jpg

Closeup:

lukebl-albums-luke-s-help-images-picture6715-aspasia2.jpg

Closeup with labels:

lukebl-albums-luke-s-help-images-picture6716-aspasia3.jpg

And here's a single frame:

lukebl-albums-luke-s-help-images-picture6719-aspasia4.jpg

For info, Aspasia is a pretty hefty asteroid with a diameter of 162km and was discovered in 1895. And fairly bright at 10th Magnitude.

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Is that another bonus fuzzy to the left of the frame.

Paul

Thanks for all the comments, guys. Yes, there are in fact dozens of faint fuzzies all over the field in the original TIF. Pegasus is an interesting area.

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Is that another bonus fuzzy to the left of the frame.

Paul

Thanks for all the comments, guys. Yes, there are in fact dozens of faint fuzzies all over the field in the original TIF. Pegasus is an interesting area.

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The first pic gives a lovely sense of space in both senses of the word. I'd like to see it with all the stars erased - just the galaxy in a sea of blackness to give one an impression of what it would look like in inter-galactic space.

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