Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Another and probably totally unnecessary noob thread


Recommended Posts

Hi everyone!

Right, noob and don't even have a telescope yet. But i've been reading up and looking around for a few weeks now and am about 80% sure that i'm going to get this one:

Tal 120 4.75-inch Newtonian Reflector Telescope (315) - Warehouse Express

Here's the spec:

Aperture, mm

120

Focal length, mm

805

Focal ratio

1:6.7

Resolving power

1.2"

Limiting visual magnitude

12.3m

Magnification, min

32x (f=25mm)

Magnification, max

162x (f=15mm and Barlow 3x)

Optical scheme

Newtonian

Angular visual field, max

1°36' (f=25mm)

Angular visual field, min

15' (f=15mm and Barlow 3x)

Minimum observing distance, m

65

Range of slow-motion control on the axes within

±4°

Latitude range of mounting

0...70°

Magnification of the finderscope

6x

Angular field of finderscope

Voltage of the supplying mains, V

220 (110) ±10%

Current frequency, Hz

50 (60)

Output voltage of the supply unit, V

12

Dimensions, mm

640x780x1400

Dimensions of the plywood case, mm

870x460x320

Weight of the telescope, kg

20

Weight of the telescope packed, kg

22

I've read that it's a good scope for a beginner and read some reviews from people who say they've been using this or similar for over 10 years. What do you all reckon on it? I'm prepared to pay around £200, absolute maximum £250.

If I were to get this telescope then what kind of views would I get of the moon or planets? Is there a better one you'd recommend?

Any good advice much appreciated and much virtual love or virtual pints given.

Taaa!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 87
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

The Tal 120 is a highly rated scope and everyone who owns one raves about it, so that should say a lot for starters.

An alternative that gets equally rave reviews and equally loved, is the Explorer 150P. Top end of your budget though at £250. But it will outperform the Tal on deepsky, there won't be much in it on the planets. The Explorer has the nicer focuser, which will be a boon when observing the planets.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Solidly built telescope with decent optics. They do drop value - possibly a scope best picked up 2nd hand (plenty about too).

Also 4.5" is not a particularly large aperture for deep sky objects, good on planets though with that f ratio (there's an old one at out local astro club and it's good for the aperture).

Do you really need an equatorial mount? You could have a 6" Dob for the same money...

Dobsonians - Skywatcher Skyliner 150P Dobsonian

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's a motorised one on fleabay right now.......

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=330470213494&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT#ht_2184wt_1137

In Hastings, could be worth a look if you are close enough.

And a 'normal' one:

http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=230525463788&ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT#ht_500wt_1154

In Rochester..........

Edited by yeti monster
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Eeep! Lots of advice there, i'll trawl through that before I buy anything. Cheers all!

Yeti, I think Hastings is a little too far. The money I saved by getting it second hand would soon be used on petrol to go and collect it. Thanks for looking though.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm always looking, a bit of a TAL freak at heart, but any scope I'll at least look at.

Where are you located btw? Perhaps a meet with a fellow SGL forumeer and a peek down (or up) their scopes will help in the never ceasing scope hunt.

South east Wales is where i'm at. I intend speaking to the astronomy society that's over down by yur as soon as I have my seeing tube. Typical I don't have one yet when Jupiter's all up in my grill every night.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Newtonians! Like a TAL 120, only not quite as good quality as the Ruskie stuff, Sky watchers and Celestrons come up for as little as 20-30 earth quids sometimes, but the eyepieces (EPs) aren't great. Kitted out with some better EPs (which you can keep if/when you sell it on) they perform rather well for small scopes.

Edited by yeti monster
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Newtonians! Like a TAL 120, only not quite as good quality as the Ruskie stuff, Sky watchers and Celestrons come up for as little as 20-30 earth quids sometimes, but the eyepieces (EPs) aren't great. Kitted out with some better EPs (which you can keep if/when you sell it on) they perform rather well for small scopes.

Interesting, I may have a gander. What about binoculars? Also handy for watching my mates mother sun bathing in the summer.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thats a nice one, how good is that compared to the one I mentioned? Also i'd have to get that one delivered too I imagine so that's about £40 extra, plus i'd have to buy a finderscope and EP's I imagine?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thats a nice one, how good is that compared to the one I mentioned? Also i'd have to get that one delivered too I imagine so that's about £40 extra, plus i'd have to buy a finderscope and EP's I imagine?

So you might as well get the full proper set up from FLO (see my earlier link), with EPs & Finder for £179 with free delivery!

Plus you then know it's coming from reputable dealer with first class service and after sales.

Edited by haitch
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a newbie myself but I know that TAL's are highly rated around here and in astro circles in general. Apparently they will last a life time (or thereabouts) :D are bomb proof, though pretty heavy. If you're not going to be carting it around too far then from what I've read/heard a TAL would be an excellent 'scope to go for.

Skywatcher are another great brand. I went for the 130P Supatrak as my first 'scope but if you've got a bit more cash then I'd go for the 150P.

That 6" Dob off eBay that someone posted if an excellent deal at that price. Wish I'd seen it a couple of weeks ago :eek: However, if you're looking for an EQ mount then this is not the one for you. If not then I'd seriously consider it!!! Just a word of warning though, be very careful who you're buying off on eBay. That's where I got my 130P Supatrak from a couple of weeks ago and it wasn't exactly as described. Nothing I couldn't sort out myself but when it's your first 'scope it can be slightly disheartening.

Happy hunting and good luck!!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'm a newbie myself but I know that TAL's are highly rated around here and in astro circles in general. Apparently they will last a life time (or thereabouts) :D are bomb proof, though pretty heavy. If you're not going to be carting it around too far then from what I've read/heard a TAL would be an excellent 'scope to go for.

Skywatcher are another great brand. I went for the 130P Supatrak as my first 'scope but if you've got a bit more cash then I'd go for the 150P.

That 6" Dob off eBay that someone posted if an excellent deal at that price. Wish I'd seen it a couple of weeks ago :eek: However, if you're looking for an EQ mount then this is not the one for you. If not then I'd seriously consider it!!! Just a word of warning though, be very careful who you're buying off on eBay. That's where I got my 130P Supatrak from a couple of weeks ago and it wasn't exactly as described. Nothing I couldn't sort out myself but when it's your first 'scope it can be slightly disheartening.

Happy hunting and good luck!!!

Just try not to drop the secondary eh? Even a Tal secondary wouldn't survive that! :)

I'm not so sure that is such a good deal on Ebay... Add the £40 for delivery, £15-20 for a finder £25 for a couple of cheap EPs and compare it to FLO's £179 delivered including EPs & finder.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

at £179 and a budget of £250, you could then also get a Telrad/Rigel Quikfinder and maybe another eyepiece. I'd also say the 6" dob from FLO seems to suit your needs although it won't be good for photography - this is a whole new ball game and a lot more expensive.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just try not to drop the secondary eh? Even a Tal secondary wouldn't survive that! :)

I'm not so sure that is such a good deal on Ebay... Add the £40 for delivery, £15-20 for a finder £25 for a couple of cheap EPs and compare it to FLO's £179 delivered including EPs & finder.

No, whatever you do DON'T drop the secondary! Then on top of that go and glue (yes, glue) it back together :D:eek: Hey, maybe sometime in the next 10 years I'll actually get out in the garden and do some star gazing with it B) It's getting slightly boring just looking at it.

Argh, you may be right about that. I didn't realise it didn't come with a finder and EP's. Yes, check out FLO in that case.

Edited by Sirius_Starseed
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I gotta do my bit for the Heritage 130p.

For a tiny 130 quid you get exactly the same optics as the skywatcher explorer 130p in a very compact format and without all the hassle of an equatorial mount. Ive previously owned a 4.5" Tal before and Id take the Heritage 130p over the Tal in a heart beat. The dobsonian mount is just a breeze.

Use the money you save to buy another eyepiece or two. Or use it to kick start your saving for the question you'll start asking no matter what you decide to buy:

"What will I buy for my next scope" :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So you might as well get the full proper set up from FLO (see my earlier link), with EPs & Finder for £179 with free delivery!

Plus you then know it's coming from reputable dealer with first class service and after sales.

Okay I have some more questions i'm afraid, I want to get this right :D

So compared to the one I mentioned in my first post, which would give me the better images and would one be able to pick up more things than the other?

Which would I be able to take pictures with?

I've realised that I don't have anywhere to leave it set up so would need to take it apart each time, i'm guessing your suggestion would be better in that respect?

Is it better EP's that give better magnification? Or a better telescope?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A dobsonian (as that Skywatcher 6" is) is not really suited to taking pictures for 2 main reasons. Firstly it isn't motorised (although dobsonians can be) so no following the sky for long exposures. Second a dob is an alt az mount which, simply put means you tilt it up and down and left and right. That's not how the sky moves so in longer exposures the object will begin to rotate in the field of view.

In actual fact the Tal wouldn't be great for imaging other than planets and the moon. Ideally you want to be able to guide it (using something like a 2nd camera to follow the sky and adjust the tracking more accurately) which requires the mount to have a guide port - I may be wrong but I don't think it even has stepper motors. The f/ratio is quite high which tends to mean even longer exposures and more tracking accuracy.

Actually, if I were you, unless you've got a money tree, I'd stay away from imaging (except to buy a couple of Philips webcams from Morgan's computer to put away in a cupboard until you are ready).

The Dob is such good value for money because you are spending most of your money on the optics rather than than a fancy mount.

It would be easier to get a suitable mount for imaging at a later date, if you decide that's the way to go, than try to get a scope in your budget ready set up for it.

Edited by haitch
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A dobsonian (as that Skywatcher 6" is) is not really suited to taking pictures for 2 main reasons. Firstly it isn't motorised (although dobsonians can be) so no following the sky for long exposures. Second a dob is an alt az mount which, simply put means you tilt it up and down and left and right. That's not how the sky moves so in longer exposures the object will begin to rotate in the field of view.

In actual fact the Tal wouldn't be great for imaging other than planets and the moon. Ideally you want to be able to guide it (using something like a 2nd camera to follow the sky and adjust the tracking more accurately) which requires the mount to have a guide port - I may be wrong but I don't think it even has stepper motors. The f/ratio is quite high which tends to mean even longer exposures and more tracking accuracy.

Actually, if I were you, unless you've got a money tree, I'd stay away from imaging (except to buy a couple of Philips webcams from Morgan's computer to put away in a cupboard until you are ready).

The Dob is such good value for money because you are spending most of your money on the optics rather than than a fancy mount.

It would be easier to get a suitable mount for imaging at a later date, if you decide that's the way to go, than try to get a scope in your budget ready set up for it.

Nice one that's great stuff.

If I wanted to get something that I could use eventually for imaging (and I inevitably will, i'm something of a horder when it comes to capturing things i've seen), then which telescope would you recommend? I'm happy to buy the telescope and then the imaging kit later down the line, much later I imagine. I'm just assuming it would be better to do it that way rather than have to buy the imagine gear and a telescope better suited to imaging when i'm ready to do that. Or am I getting it all backwards?

You can probably tell i'm something of a nightmare with questions, I need to know the ins and outs of a cats **** before I can do anything :D My maths and physics lecturers almost had nervous breakdowns :eek:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it's better I pass you over to the Sith Lords from the dark side at this point as there are a number of ways to go.

I've stayed away from imaging up until now having looked into it and realised the costs of doing it reasonably well but as a basic shopping list for Deep sky imaging I'd guess you'd at least want (if you don't want to be upgrading within 6 months of starting)...

A HEQ5 or EQ6 mount (Unless you go for an SCT on a heavy duty wedge mount)

The biggest Apochromatic refractor you can afford or an astrograph reflector or a 10" SCT

A method for guiding it - possibly a 2nd scope fitted on guide scope rings or an off axis guider. A 2nd camera for guiding

Something to take images with (Maybe a DSLR - preferably modified to be more sensitive or at least a grand's worth of CCD camera)

A laptop to control everything and put the images on.

Possibly some narrowband filters depending on your light pollution

Good quality RGBL filters if using a mono CCD.

An observatory to keep it all in if you don't want to spend more time putting it up or taking it down than using it.

A scope to look through to pass the time whilst that set up is imaging

Lots of time to spend in front of a computer screen processing images

A patient partner

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.