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Andrew*

........wow!.........

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(as I didn't seem to get any notice of my post in "can't wait", I started a new thread in a more suitable section.)

:shock: that's all I can really say!

just in the middle of a beautiful night. My second real success.

First saw the incredible redness of Betelgeuse.

Then managed not only to see the orion nebula (M42 - I know you know, but I don't!), but I saw its distinctive shape too. Couldn't see a thing of it with my naked I, but I pointed in the direction it shoud be, and there it was, just where it should be, and it was just stunning.

And that's just the start. Eventually found Andromeda galaxy (M31), but as it was just a smudge of a vaguely eliptical shape, I wasn't as stunned as with M42 and M45, but was really chuffed to have found it at all. How can you see that with the naked eye???

Tested my navigation skills in vain, but failed to find M33 or M34.

Additionally, saw the absolutely incredible sight of an extremely bright light flying very quickly across the sky. Went from directly overhead to near orion (at 1am or so) in just a second or so. :shock: And otherwise saw a few meteors in various places.

:DI'm absolutely thrilled to have seen what I have, and it's not over yet. I'm going to see if Saturn will show its rings for me. :saturn:

Sorry for such a huge post :?

:)

Astrophethean (now I really feel I deserve the astro part!)

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Well, I did see something of saturn, although I could only identify it because of its oval shape (I meant oval instead of elliptical in the original post about M42). I couldn't see the rings. Again, it was clearest in my 10mm and with any more powerful EP it just got fuzzier. What magnification do you need to see saturn's rings?

I saw another comet, and then as a thin layer of cloud was starting to fly across the sky, I decided to end the night with a last look at the Pleiades. That beautiful cluster will always be my favourite view, being my first.

Now Sirius' colourful flicker has just risen, and I'll be packing up after a magnificent night.

AstroPhethean

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It'll take you a few years to see all of the things available throughout the year - but you'll never forget a few things.. For me it was my first view of the moon, Saturn, M45 and M13.

Sounds like you enjoyed yourself.

Ant

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Your excitement is radiating from your post! Lovely report.... 8)

Caz :)

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I went out last night about 3.30am, to look at orion, just the the naked eye, Sirius was looking really nice, I love that star!

I did see a few meteors coming from Orion's general direction, so perhaps a few Orionid stragglers?

Sadly about half hour before, it peed down of rain, I couldn't be bothered to put my trainers on...wet feet hehe!

I'm glad you had a nice time out there last night. M42 was totally stunning for me me when I first saw it too.

Didn't you see Saturn last night? I had a quick look with the binos, kinda looked like a deformed egg lol.

Anyway really pleased you had a nice time!

Kain

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Thanks all. Yes, it was quite a night.

Steve, I'm using the Tasco 4.5" I bought off eBay. I'm just getting the hang of it, so once I've got those EPs off Russ, I'll get the best use of it, and then consider upgrading.

Any ideas about what that bright light might have been? It was brighter than any star in the sky and it was insanely fast.

AstroPhethean

P.S. of course I need to correct my correction, I meant M31, not M42

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HI

I can remember my first glance into space, mind boggling and believe me it still is. I envy your youth as you have many years ahead of you to search the wonders of the heavens, I'm 71 and hoping for many more myself. I wish I started at 10 !

Robin

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Have you checked the collimation of the scope?

no. I haven't. Nor am I at all experienced in such matters. The thought of course crossed my mind, but I don't understand why I can get the likes of M42 clear, but not saturn.

AP

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Tasco Galaxsee 4.5 was my first scope, and alot of people knock it, but I saw loads with mine, and it made me want to get my dob.

Saturn's rings are visible with the Tasco, but the planet is quite small so it's very hard to pick up the devision. However the rings are there, and it's a stunning sight when you first see ole ringy.

Kain

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In a nut shellit's because of the magnifications involved.

You would view M42 under a fairly low power, as it is an extrended object (quite large) and you need to see it with surrounding "clear" sky.

But with Saturn you need a higher power to get the image scale which means that you are magnifying the air turbulance.

Besides, I've just realised, your comparing apples and oranges - the conditions required for good seeing of planets(steady) it totally different to the seeing required for Deep Sky (Transparancy).

Hope that helps.

Ant

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You can begin to see the rings at about 30x, and it gets better from there. As I've mentioned ad nauseam, my second scope was a Tasco Luminova 4.5", and it was a very good 4.5" scope. We used to joke that they had accidentally put a good mirror in it, but it could be used at 225x, the theoretical limit for it. You can get a rough collimation with a cap collimator, and I have even seen instructions for collimation using just your eye and the focuser tube. You should be able to discern the rings if your collimation is even close.

My first target was Saturn, using a Meade 4.5" scope with an inferior mirror, and a Huygenian 12.5mm ep. I could see the rings. I didn't collimate that scope for about 4 years after I got it. I didn't even know what collimation was. It still gave me nice views of the stuff I could see.

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hmmm... Maybe I'm missing something altogether, because I still haven't seen it. Even at 5am with a 25mm and 3x barlow (decent ones) with good collimation...

I'll just see what happens next time.

Andrew

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Saw Saturns and it's rings easily in my younger brothers 114mm last year. You should see the rings in yours. Keep at it.

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Andrew i think that you might be expecting too much too quick mate.

With any scope everything you look at has to be done with patience.

You have to train your eye to coordinate with your brain in order to see any detail

on most celestial objects.

Remember that just because you have seen one object this doesn't

necessarily mean that you will instantly see all objects.

I realised this when i bought my first setup which cost me nearly £2000 including all the

extras that i indulged in.

After spending all that dosh and all i could see with it was smudges with no detail even

when i had near perfect focus.

Keep at it mate you WILL get there soon enough.

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Thanks Jamie. It makes sense. I'll keep on trying. When I get the chance.... :D

Andrew

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No Caz, not yet. It's on my Christmas list. Are you about to suggest using the eyepiece preview thing that Steve keeps on posting screen shots of? Looks like a good little tool. Anyway, I use Stellarium for finding what's on when, which does the job alright.

Incidentally, what does Starry Night do, and what's the real difference between Enthusiast, Pro, Pro Plus, etc.?

Andrew

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