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andromeda in 8x42's


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Ok i have just borrowed a pair of opticrion 8x42 bins from work,these retail at £220.

Andromeda looks like as expected i suppose as a small patch of light in these binoculars.

As you may know im after a descent size pair,but as a trial i wanted to try these,if i say bought the celestrons 15x70's for £50 would i see more detail in this type of target?

I am looking for something better but just wondered as a stop gap how much better they would be compared to 8x42's.

Thanks Gary

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Hi Gary,

Not really. It will just look larger. M31 is quite diffuse in binoculars.I find M33 much more difficult in 8x42's.

I've not looked through the Opticrons myself,although I have read good reports about them. If you still have them have a look at M36-37-38 in Auriga,nice clusters.

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From the objective size and the magnifications you would get a bigger image BUT a dimmer image.

So would see less detail in the 15x70's.

You have to consider both the increase in objectives and the increase in magnification which delivers a dimmer image.

Since M31 is pretty dim to start with it seems counter productive.

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I must say that I lke the view of M31 through my Helios 15x70 binoculars, especially as I found it last night for the first time!

I may have spotted it before but was not sure if it was mist or cloud!

I have not managed to find it using my 10x50 binoculars.

It is still a feint smudge, due to light pollution from the outskirts of London, and also the moon last night.

I think it is just a bigger feint smudge through the 15x70 binoculars!

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thanks for your views,well in reality most are faint smudges i suppose,i dont think i done to bad for 8x42's then.

what i do want really is the light gathering power,but from johninderby's review with the helios apollos it seems even though same size objective there one can still be much better than the other.

oh well more reading i suppose.lol.

gaz ;)

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From the objective size and the magnifications you would get a bigger image BUT a dimmer image.

So would see less detail in the 15x70's.

You have to consider both the increase in objectives and the increase in magnification which delivers a dimmer image.

Since M31 is pretty dim to start with it seems counter productive.

I find in my 15x70's that I see the bright core better than in my smaller binoculars.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've never used a pair of binos bigger than 10x50s but I have owned many pairs over the years varying from 7x25s through 10x50s. At least three pairs were in the £100-160 bracket.

However, the best pair I've owned were also the cheapest 10x50s I've ever purchased. Rocktrails @ £14.99 from Lidl. They have excellent contrast and are so sharp that I located Venus at about 4.45pm today and could clearly see it's crescent phase with them. Some of the more expensive ones I've owned have been terrible for night time viewing, suffering from quite bad coma, where the light from a star makes it look like a bright comet and therefore difficult to focus. Jupiter with the Rocktrails, at the moment is a clearly defined disc with four moons clearly visible most nights. Andromeda (M31) is a quite large elliptical smudge with an obviously brighter core. On exceptionally clear nights it appears noticeably bigger too and the skies over me are never free from LP.

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