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First Light Clestron 15x170 and Horizon 8115 Tripod


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Ordered both from FLO following discussion on the tripod with them as I wasn't sure which to go for. Delivery next day spot on.

Finally had the chance to use both last night using a large binocular attachment from FLO.

Time 11.00-11.45 BST. Had to wait for the moon to pop over my rooftop. I was well impressed with the tripod, solid, steady as a rock and no 'judder' in movement. The height, without use of the central column, was perfect for me (I'm 5' 10") I can certainly recommend the tripod to anyone. OK, enough of the tripod review onto the view.

I was very impressed with the appearance of the moon through these, far more of a perception of depth than with 10x50 and the extra 5x gives so much more to look at. No false colour fringing around the moon was visible and the focussing was easy to maintain and tracking the moon as it moved was simplicity with no jerkiness. I had a look at my favourite area first, Mare Imbrium, even this close to full Copernicus stood out. Plato was very obvious and stood out as usual.

Finally, as a cloud back was heading rapidly to spoil the fun I took a long look at Mare Crisium as what looked stunning was the way in which the terminator 'cut-across' the Eimmart and Prom Agarum areas showing what looked like two open handles above Mare Crisium.

So, in summary I am really pleased with the performance of both of these and can really recommend them.

Rob

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nice review! I cannot wait to get my 15x70s next week. I really like binocular viewing too. will be interesting to see how you get on with them when there's a darker sky.

I bet they gather some light at 15x170! ;)

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I was surprised not to read any comments about ghost images or internal reflections when observing such a bright object as the Moon. I believe these issues are evident in these binoculars.

Edited by enigma
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Thanks for the comments. Unfortunately dark skies won't help me! Approx 10m away to the SW I have a lovely (sarcasm) LP Sodium street light! Have to be honest and say I didn't have any problems with ghost images or internal reflections last night and I really was giving them a through (sp?) test out looking for faults. On the experience of this pair from FLO I wouldn't have any problems recommending them.

Rob

Edited by Rob1961
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Did you look for internal reflections while looking at the moon at all,sorry yes of cause you looked at the moon(you said) but i meant did you look for this especially or just not notice any.

Usually its gonna be while viewing a bright object if its gonna happen.

Sounds like you got a good pair.

G ;)

Edited by stafford_stargazer
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I've just been doing a comparison between a pair of Celestron 15x70s and Helios Apollo 15x70s tonight (I'll post on the test tomorrow)

There are no ghosting or internal reflection problems at all when looking at the Moon with the Celestron 15x70s I've been testing. However these came from FLO and they test them before sending them out to customers to make sure they're collimated and don't have any other problems. I wouldn't buy a pair unless the dealer checked them first, as it's not uncommon for the Celestrons to have collimation problems as shipped from the factory.

John

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I tried my Celestron 15x70 for the first time last night also on a Horizon 8115. The binoculars wasn't held as steady as I would like, maybe I will try my other tripod adapter.

One problem I found was that I could not get the binoculars to focus without my spectacles on. I am near sighted with -5 to -6 (left eye) corrections. I am able to achieve focus without specs with all other binoculars that I use including Bresser, Hawke and others. Could it be that the Celestron only allows focus to infinity up to -5 myopia?

Alan

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I own several different pairs of binoculars and all show some ghost images and internal reflections when viewing the Moon. I think these are not indications of a bad sample, but a design and coatings issue. I also have the Celestron SkyMaster 15x70 and I can see some annoying ghost images and internal reflections when viewing the Moon, even though the binoculars seem to be collimated well. I am just surprised that some people here say that there are no such issues at all with these binoculars. I would expect some ghost images and internal reflections even with the most expensive binoculars.

Edited by enigma
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Hi, I went out last wiith them and deliberately set about looking specifically for ghost images and internal reflections. I wasn't able to detect any internal reflection but did identify some very, very slight ghost imaging BUT this was ONLY when I deliberately placed the moon at the extreme edges of the field of view and even then the ghosts were very hard to detect. So I'd still thoroughly recommend these particular binoculars from FLO.

Thanks

Rob

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I also have the 15 by 70's and the coating is not as good as some 20 by 80's I have bought but I also can confirm very little ghosting / internal reflections. Yuo can get some red / green false colours by deliberately looking at the moon with odd angles etc. But the moon is glorious and 3D when looking at it.

With regard to the diopter issue..the 15 by 70 have more of a range on the eye dioter adj than the 20 by 80 revelations. So with one eye more short sighted than the other I can only get both eyes in focus just.. .But both have massive travel on the main focus so even with poor eyes your should get a focus..To be honest I can use my glasses with both by just rolling down the rubber shields so try that..

Regards

Mark

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The only ghosting I have seen with my binoculars is in the left tube of my Garrett 100/45° and that's only on Venus. A good target to sort the wheat from the chaff.

I would be interested to know what the actual 'true' aperture of these 20x80's.

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The 20 by 80's are supposed to be 80mm. I can confirm they go about 0.5mag below the celeston 15 by 70's for what it is worth but that might be due to the extra magnification rather than aperture as I understand these things.

How can I check the true aperture? I would be happy to check..

Mark

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Hi Mark,

If you wind the focus in as far as it goes then get a bright torch and shine it down the eyepiece end from around 2 feet away and then measure the light cast on the wall this will give you the true aperture.Of course they have to be mounted for this and the wall should be around 1 foot away when you measure.

Hope this helps.

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OK the Celestrons measure 64mm so 6mm short and the 80mm measure about 72mm to about 8mm short..So the Celestrons are less than 10% short but the 80mm are a full 10% down on the advertised aperture...

So now you know.

I am sure a £250 set of 70mm with high transmission would outperform the humble revelation binos...

All I can say is that the wild duck cluster looked fab in the 80mm last night..

Mark

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I will try some tests now on double stars. Albeiro at 30 ish secs of arc splits relatively easily. I thought I could see extension on Mizar but I will try some in the 20 ish secs of arc to see how low I can go...

The moons of Jupiter looked pretty spot like so I think I should do alright although I could not make out the fourth moon last night as it pulled away from the disk when all the others with their etx etc at a star party in Bristol could see..

Mark

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I will try some tests now on double stars. Albeiro at 30 ish secs of arc splits relatively easily. I thought I could see extension on Mizar but I will try some in the 20 ish secs of arc to see how low I can go...

The moons of Jupiter looked pretty spot like so I think I should do alright although I could not make out the fourth moon last night as it pulled away from the disk when all the others with their etx etc at a star party in Bristol could see..

Mark

I was out early last night trying a scope out but was also out with my 10x50's. I can split Albireo if they are mounted but not if I hand hold them. I just love that double.Beautiful in my 15x70's,Golden Yellow and pale Blue.

Mizar/Alcor is another of my favourite targets. I can't say I've had a true split of Mizar in my 15x70s but I have in the 100/45° I have.

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he 80mm measure about 72mm to about 8mm short..

Probably true. Most 80mm have only between 72 and 74 mm true aperture.

The Apollo 15x70 has 69 mm aperture. One of the many reasons why it's better then a moderate binocular.

I did some testing between my former Helios Stellar 20x80 and my Apollo (TS Marine actually) 15x70. It saw as deep as the 20x80 without doubt.

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So in terms of splitting doubles in the 80mm. 30 seconds of arc is easy. Once you get down to 20mm it is pretty tough..I am presuming that below 20mm you need two perhaps equally paired mag 6 stars to split them but I have not checked that yet.

Mizar is extended but does not split. I am sure one of those posh 80mm binos with apo optics coudl split it.

Mark

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