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Another Jupiter from the 24th


Starman
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Still wading through all the captures from the 24th but I got bored not doing anything with them so here's one taken with the GRS having rotated nicely into view. A nice regular 'wave-like' pattern precedes the GRS and oval BA is now nicely positioned directly above the GRS itself.

2010-08-24_00-53-35_RGB-flat.jpg

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Hi Nick,

I had to go back and check the build file but no, this is pure RGB. I did add a blended R+G layer as luminance but I didn't feel it added anything to the result so turned it off. I'm just coming to the end of the processing run on this data set - it's taken ages! The last set covers the eclipse ingress of Ganymede and I'm delighted that you can see the progression of the shadow across Ganymede's disc! I'll post these results later.

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Thanks for the comments. The seeing was better than average and I'd estimate it to be 8/10. The seeing on the 9th of August was better at 9/10 but I had technical issues with my scope's location on that morning and the results aren't as good as they could have been. These have been sorted now thankfully!

Here's another result - a single IR shot used to determine the longitude of the GRS and Oval BA.

2010-08-24_02-09-10_742.jpg

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Simply outstanding Pete. The amount of detail and the quality of that detail is just breathtaking. I am intrigued as to the relationship between the GRS and the smaller storm to the south. Will be very interesting to see how these two interact.

Some wonderful delicate vertical rippling going on in the faint southern component of the SEB too.

You truly have a talent for imaging Jupiter

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The grid comes from WinJupos and is accurate for the time of the image. The dotted line down the centre of the grid identifies the central meridian of the planet and the value of this is listed in the CM1 and CM2 longitudes given (ignore CM3). The grid lines then provide a measuring tool to allow me to work across the disk to work out the longitude values for the GRS and oval BA.

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