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Searched with the 10" last night, still couldn't find it. I blame the moon :-p

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That makes me feel better. Couldn't find it with 6". Though it is in a tricky bit of sky at the moment. Too many stars. Fingers crossed for a clear night in about ten days time!

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Next 8th October, the comet will be near the Double Cluster in Perseus. It will be New Moon and hopefully it'll be a fine occasion to spot it or even image it as it will be nicelly framed together with de double cluster.

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True Rui, but cloud may not play ball, so I'm treating every clear night from now as potentially the last chance I will get to see it.

Supposed to be clear tonight and Hartley should almost eclipse Lambda Cas at 9.30pm. If I cannot find it tonight I should probably think about swapping my scope for a backgammon set.

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I found the comet last night quite easily with a 6" reflector not far away from Lambda Cas. The comet appeared faint, but I could see it with direct vision and better at low magnification. It appeared to have a circular coma and a faint core.

Edited by enigma

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I managed to spot it tonight. It is very faint in my 8" dob, coma visible slight brightening towards the centre with averted vision. Currently less than a degree from Lambda Cas and so is easy to find via starhopping.

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I'm pleased to hear it's barely visible in an 8" - I've just been out with binos and couldn't spot it at all. I was *just* making out a nearby 8.5 mag star, after about 10 minutes of dark adaptation, but the area where the comet should be was just a blank zone. There was a moment where I thought I'd found it, but then I realized I was just seeing a little cluster of stars nearby. I'm itching to get a sight of this comet now!

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I'm pleased to hear it's barely visible in an 8" - I've just been out with binos and couldn't spot it at all. I was *just* making out a nearby 8.5 mag star, after about 10 minutes of dark adaptation, but the area where the comet should be was just a blank zone. There was a moment where I thought I'd found it, but then I realized I was just seeing a little cluster of stars nearby. I'm itching to get a sight of this comet now!

this was my experience just now almost word for word with the 15x70s!

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Ditto with the 10" here. There are two very little star clusters in the vicinity playing havoc with my finderscope and bins views only to find in the scope they resolve to star clusters. No comet to be seen :-(

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Ditto with the 10" here. There are two very little star clusters in the vicinity playing havoc with my finderscope and bins views only to find in the scope they resolve to star clusters. No comet to be seen :-(

And with a 4" refractor and 10x50 binoculars here - Heavens Above lists it @ mag 6 :icon_salut:

Edited by John

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I just looked on heavens above too. When I saw it was supposed to be mag 6 and quite easy to locate I thought I would be in with a chance using my 15x70 bins. Now reading the posts above it seems I'll need my scope.

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I spotted it quite easily with my new 6" Newt. Comparing the starfield with the starfield as per the Heavens-Above page on 103/P, and entering the position into the digital setting circle function of the lxd75 and I could spot the comet with direct vision. It's not easy, and I didn't attempt to look for it with the 15x70. I'd say that the magnitude (6 ish) would be accurate given that the size of the coma is not *that* small.

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I have heard reports that Heavens's Above is posting inaccurate magnitude estimates. Most people around seems to have estimates the current magnitude at around 8 to 8.5 which just about ties in with tonight's observations.

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Correct...although I am others on Epoxi are now estimating closer to Mag 7.5, thoug with a 20 arcmin coma, this one is tricky..

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looks like one for the 12" dob and the 35mm Panoptic at the weekend if it's clear then! unfortunately it was cloudy when I went to bed last night and I now realise it was a decent night!! aaaagh!

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I had a good view in my 10 inch dob. It was SW of a brigth filed star. ? Lambda Cass. It has a nucleus and a triangular shaped "tail". Looks to me like a brighter galaxy of say mag 10. It was definitely not visible in the finder so thats why I would go for lower than mag 10...

Very much brighter than a few weeks ago when it was nearer mag 13/14 to my eyes.

Also for good measure I logged NGC 4750 and NGC 3329. Two galaxies over in Draco..NGC 4750 is pretty "bright" for a galaxy...(but a lot fainter than the comet!)

Mark

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I had a go at imaging the comet last night and after the imaging run decided to have a look, I have quite a bit of light polution but can still see the MW faintly, the moon had risen but quite low. I could find no trace of the comet through steady 15x70 bins although I would detdct a few small clusters that I thought were the comet, in the 10 inch Newt I could just detect the comet with averted vision. I was surprised how faint the comet looked in comparison to the images I as taking. the comet must be sitting around +10 +11 mag ?

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Visually yes, the attached graph from Toni Scarmato shows the photometric magnitudes up to 17th Sept, and it's brightening significantly since then, we're both now measuring around mag 7.5 photometric/integrated, but the diffuse coma means that visually it's still a struggle (20 arcmin last night for the coma)

post-14410-133877487608_thumb.jpg

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First thing I did was point a camera at Lam Cas. Comet showed up very easily. Used that as a star map and once I knew where it was I could make out some very faint smudge with averted vision. And my sky was as dark and clear as I have ever seen it, roughly mag 5.2

Am I right in thinking the mag estimates for comets are like those for galaxies, in that the surface brightness is actually much fainter? Mag 7 should be very easy but I could see mag 11 stars more clearly than I could see 103P Hartley last night.

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Yes, essentially the comet is spread over such a wide area, that you're either looking at a mag for just the "nucleus" portion or across the entire object..

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iamjulian

I do find comparing the comet to galaxies useful. It is now about the same as NGC2841/7331 so just at the limit of 15 x 70s with averted vision. A surface brightness of around mag 11..

Mark

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I observed the comet again last night with an 8" reflector. It appeared quite faint and I could just make it out from the darker background. The coma and core were seen better with averted vision.

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Just got back from the Starpad. :o

The comet's not too spectacular as far as things go, but this baby is huge.. nearly as big as the ET/Owl cluster. It was half-way between Phi Cassiopeiae (one of ET's eyes) and Theta/Mu Cassiopeiae tonight, and was easily seen through my 11x70's as a large, diffuse glow. Through the 16" LightBridge, a small bright core was very evident, and seemed to be tucked into the southwest portion of the comet's glow. I'd be surprised if this one makes it to naked-eye status but it's still worth a look. :) (Sketch will be posted asap.)

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I had another look at this comet last night and found it noteably brighter than when I viewed it last Wednesday, If was easy to find in 15x70 binoculars. Reminded my of a smaller version of M33. Its certinally brighter but no firework.

Mark

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