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Keiran

Monthly Guide for September 2010

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Hi all,

this is my second attempt at this, I hope it is of some us to you, and if there any events you think should be added, feel free to PM me...

Moon Phases:

Last quarter - Wednesday 1st September.

New moon - Wednesday 8th September.

First quarter - Wednesday 15th September.

Full moon - Thursday 23rd September.

Last quarter - Fridat 1st September.

Wednesday 1st September 2010:

The moon will be in its last quater... The open cluster ‘Pleiades’ will be visible just above the moon.

Just above the moon will be Andromeda (M31), the Double Cluster and the Triangle Galaxy (M33). Capella will be to the North of these, while Jupiter and Uranus will be to the South.

These can be observed after midnight rising in the East.

Thursday 2nd September 2010:

The Butterfly Cluster (M6) and M7 can be observed low in the South after 21:00. Just above you will find the open cluster M25, with the open cluster NGC 6530 close by.

At the same time rising in the North - East is the two open clusters M39 and IC 1396.

At around about 04:00 of the 3rd, keep an eye out low in the East, as Orion starts to rise.

Monday 6th September 2010:

The morning of the 6th the moon will be less than 10% lit... at about 04:00 you will be able to see M44 and the moon close by.

Wednesday 8th September 2010:

The day of the new moon... Over head at about 23:00 you will be able to observe the Cocoon Nebular (IC5146). Around the Cocoon nebular, there is a field of clusters like NGC 7209, 7243, 7235, IC 1936, IC1369 and M39.

Friday 10th September 2010:

With the new moon just passed, it is the ideal time to check out some of these hard to see objects...

With the Perseus constellation rising higher it could be worth checking out the Mag 7 cluster IC348. It resides next to the star Atik.

In the same constellation there is a group of Mag 12 upwards galexys... NGC 1281, 1276, 1277, 1274, 1275... Down to NGC 1259, these will be hard to see, but would make for a great image.

Saturday 11th September 2010:

With the moon still out of the way, Pleiades would be great to check out.

Wednesday 15th September 2010:

Brings the moon in its first quarter.

Saturday 18th September 2010:

This will be a great opportunity to check out the Deslandres area of the moon, full of creators, and lots of things to look at.

Tuesday 21st September 2010:

Keep your eye out for Jupiter and Uranus, they will be very close together.

Thursday 23rd September 2010:

At around 00:00 the moon will full and high in the south... Just to the east, but very close is Jupiter and Uranus.

Due to the Autumn Equinox, Venus will be at its brightest.

Have a good month observing and i hope this gives you a few things to think about J

Thanks for looking

Keiran

Edited by Keiran

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Thanks for al your hard work Keiran

This really helps save me some google time :-)

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Not a problem Guys... if you can think of anything else please feel free to add it :o

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