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What are the basics i will need?


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Righty oh gang :))

Firstly i havent a clue what my scopes proper names is ?

I have a skywatcher on an EQ3-2 Mount.

Its got a plague on the side with "Telescope" D=150MM F=750MM

Any ideas?

The lens i got with it are 2x Barlow a super 25 wide angle long eye relief and another with just Super 10mm. Are these any good? what else do i need?

Also i have a Canon 350d, i want to start playing with imaging so does anyone know what i need to buy so i can start?

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Its a Skywatcher 150. Its a 6" reflector. The 150 tells you in mm how wide the main mirror is and the 750 tells you its 750mm focal length. Generically its a fast reflector with a focal ratio of F5.

The lenses.,,,,,,,, The 25mm is a wide angle lens and the 10mm is close up. The smaller the number the higher the magnification.

It works like this - take the foacl length (750) divide it by the eyepiece focal length (say 25) and you get 30. So with the 25mm lens in the telescope and eyepiece give you x30 magnification.

With the 10mm in you get 750 divided by 10 so a magnification of x75.

The Barlow lens basically doubles up the power of each eyepiece so if you have the 10mm lens in with the Barlow you get x150 magnification.

The eyepieces that come with the scope are ok and nowhere near as bad as some people would have you believe but once you have some eyetime in you should look at upgrading. Depending on the focuser the scope has (some of the 150s have a 1.25" focuser only while the newer ones have a 1.25 and 2" focuser) will guide your choice of eyepiece. MOst epople would sugget a low power decent quality eyepiece as a first purchase (something like a 32mm). Eyepieces range from cheap (around £19) to seriously off the planet expensive (like £500).

Other useful stuff to have - a dewshield. It wraps round the front of the scope and stops the optical bits dewing up.

A red light torch to preserve your night vision.

Imaging - seriously exepnmsive and complicated and I wont try and answer that cos I dont do it. As a minmum you'd need a motor to drive the scope in its Right Ascension (RA) axis - they are sometimes called 'clock drives' cos they used to be powered like a clock ie wound up.

Its a good small scope - my sister has one as her mobile scope. Theres tons of things you could buy - this hobby is a potenial money trap - but I;d sugget get a dewshield and a red light torch and take your time getting to understand the scope before you rush in spending money. SImply cos so many beginners make so many xepensive mistakes when they start out.

ps dont get hung up on magnification. The scope you have has a maximum magnification of x300 but UK seeing conditions usally limit magnification to no more than x230 and often less than that.

Edited by Astro_Baby
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Its a Skywatcher 150. Its a 6" reflector. The 150 tells you in mm how wide the main mirror is and the 750 tells you its 750mm focal length. Generically its a fast reflector with a focal ratio of F5.

The lenses.,,,,,,,, The 25mm is a wide angle lens and the 10mm is close up. The smaller the number the higher the magnification.

It works like this - take the foacl length (750) divide it by the eyepiece focal length (say 25) and you get 30. So with the 25mm lens in the telescope and eyepiece give you x30 magnification.

With the 10mm in you get 750 divided by 10 so a magnification of x75.

The Barlow lens basically doubles up the power of each eyepiece so if you have the 10mm lens in with the Barlow you get x150 magnification.

The eyepieces that come with the scope are ok and nowhere near as bad as some people would have you believe but once you have some eyetime in you should look at upgrading. Depending on the focuser the scope has (some of the 150s have a 1.25" focuser only while the newer ones have a 1.25 and 2" focuser) will guide your choice of eyepiece. MOst epople would sugget a low power decent quality eyepiece as a first purchase (something like a 32mm). Eyepieces range from cheap (around £19) to seriously off the planet expensive (like £500).

Other useful stuff to have - a dewshield. It wraps round the front of the scope and stops the optical bits dewing up.

A red light torch to preserve your night vision.

Imaging - seriously exepnmsive and complicated and I wont try and answer that cos I dont do it. As a minmum you'd need a motor to drive the scope in its Right Ascension (RA) axis - they are sometimes called 'clock drives' cos they used to be powered like a clock ie wound up.

Its a good small scope - my sister has one as her mobile scope. Theres tons of things you could buy - this hobby is a potenial money trap - but I;d sugget get a dewshield and a red light torch and take your time getting to understand the scope before you rush in spending money. SImply cos so many beginners make so many xepensive mistakes when they start out.

ps dont get hung up on magnification. The scope you have has a maximum magnification of x300 but UK seeing conditions usally limit magnification to no more than x230 and often less than that.

Hey astro babe you are a shinin star :)

Many thanks i now have a little knowledge hehehehe

All points taken onboard and re the lens i had it worked out but back to front :D

The fouser you talk about i have measured mine looks like 2" is this good news?

I will now go study and searching for the bits you recommend...

Thanks

re expensive hobby......... i was into a very very expensive hobby before this one so know all the pitfalls of buying twice, that wont happen.

Yes i wil get another scope but this is mainly for my litle angel Kellie ( i missed her dearly when she was at Grandmas :)( ) to learn and play with and if i can play along the way so be it.

Sorry if i ask divvy questions all....

Clint

Edited by The_Kirbys
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Dont worry about questions - thats how we all learn.

If its a two inch focuser it will probably look like this

Skywatcher - Skywatcher Newtonian Focuser 1.25/2 inch

Whereas if its a basic 1.25" focusre it will look like this...

http://www.astro-baby.com/Skywatcher%20Focuser%20Tune%20up/Skywatcher%20Focuser%20000.jpg

If its a 2" it will have a removable plug/adapter so it can take either 1.25" eyepieces OR 2" eyepieces.

Generally high powered eyepieces stick to 1.25" format while wider field ones use a 2" fitting.

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And, the most important: Adjust your expectations!

Forget all those nice photos at NASA website, colourful nebulae, fine detail in Jupiter's atmosphere, Hubble's photo of the day, etc.

When you look through the eyepiece, nebulae ang galaxies will gray. Planets will show little detail... Ok you'll manage to easily see the 4 Galilean moons at Jupiter, as well as the equatorial belt and eventually other detail in it's atmosphere; the rings at Saturn and at least it's bigger moon Titan; follow the changing phases of Venus and eventually of Mercury either; Mars will only show some detail a couple months around opposition; and at the Moon, well that's the one celestial body that will show you more than the photos you saw!!!

At the sun, you can expect to see sunspots and detail in it, but only with an apperture filter (or a rarer Herschel's wedge). If you have a dark sun filter thar screws in the eyepiece barrel (that eventually came with your scope), throw it away.

Well, you've got a lot of advises. Now you also need to read some books, to know and understand what you'll see in the sky.

You obviously have a computer. Then download a free planetaruim, to show what's up in the sky at any time. The best is: Stellarium

Enjoy the sky!

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Sorry if i ask divvy questions all....

We've all been there, don't worry about it and keep asking!! :p

Your SW 150 comes on an Equatorial Mount (EQ3-2), it can take a bit of time to get your head round how it works. This site covers all the basic's and was a great help for me - Setting Up an Equatorial Mount - McWiki

Also for helping you find things (Rui beat me to it :)) I'd also recommend Stellarium it's a great programme.

Last but definitely not least Astro_Baby's site, lots of great info from polar aligning to collimation - Astro-Baby Astronomy Website

Clear Skies

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Something else to add to A_B's list - a copy of Turn Left at Orion (try borrowing it from you local library before buying) and a darn good wooly hat! (Winter is drawing in!)

I agree - I just received my copy of this book today it is brilliant, I see now why so many people rave about it :p

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