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Celestron Sky Scout or Meade MySky Plus?


Guest LJG7777
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Guest LJG7777

Hi guys,

I know this has probably been discussed before but I can only find threads that mention the MySky not the MySky Plus.

I've recently moved onto a Meade Lightbridge 8 from a ext 60 due to the noise a goto scope seems to make (too noisy for my neighbours at that time of night) and need some advice.

I want to purchase one of the above to locate objects to view and want your opinions on which one to buy to put together a good 'push to' scope. Please don't go off at a tangent about why using manual charts is best etc hahaha!

I'll eventually mount the gizmo to the scope (it seems that interference from the scopes metal parts seems to be thing of the past with certain mounts that can be purchased these days).

My main concerns about the Sky Scout is that if I'm trying to locate an object which isn't visible with the naked eye then I won't be able to identify it through my telescope as I have no visual references or markers from the Sky Scout (due to the lack of visual reference). Even though the gizmo will be telling me where it is.

My main concern with the MySky Plus is that many have shot it down in flames (or maybe that was just the MySky and not the Plus version) and said that the Sky Scout is best. Please help! :mad:

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I have the Celestron Skyscout. I can understand what Pete says about the novelty wearing off but I do use it on occasion to locate objects when binocular observing. I think you'd really need to have some idea of what you are trying to locate and what to expect to see through the scope even when using the Skyscout or MySky.

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Like Peter, i also had a Skyscout when they were new on the market and the novelty wore off very quickly because it has zero magnification (i knew this) so you really are flying blind when locating or identifying objects. If it is pointing even a tiny amount off course then it will identify something else and locate something else for the same reason. Its fine for larger objects like the moon,planets and brighter stars. You cant miss those because you can see them with the naked eye. Galaxies,nebulae etc are going to be much harder to find or identify. It will point you in the general direction but you will still have to do some searching with your eye at the telescope.

I personally think that the Mysky looks cheap and plastic. Not to mention the fact it looks like a taser. Try telling the flying squad at 4am (your neighbours called them saying that you were in your garden with a taser),that it is only an astronomy tool.

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The Skyscout I find to really be an introductory device for adults and kids who are totally new to the subject and want a good intro.

It teaches you a lot of stuff but not much more than you can read in the magazines at a fraction of the cost over a year.

From an observing viewpoint it's not really a finder - more of a pointer at a general area of sky. For use with a telescope a red dot finder or right angle finder, I would think, are superior.

Anyone who has a basic knowledge of the sky will understandably get bored with it quick. :)

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Guest LJG7777
with a dob, you'd probably be better off with a Wixey and either a star atlas or a program like Cartes du Ceil, Stellarium etc etc.

I'm thinking of adding one of these to my GEM mounted Newt in the near future.

I'm liking the Wixey idea and have just downloaded Stellarium so might give this option a whirl. I'm still open to other comments about the MySky or Sky Scout though if anyone else wants to chip in.

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One other thing - it's a pain to get a good gps lock on the Skyscout if you're near anything metalic, or eletrical cables. And the batteries don't last long on a cold night. :)

Edited by brantuk
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With the Scout you had to enter your co-ordinates and then the time and date. Then the GPS took over. One night i grew stubble waiting for the GPS to lock onto 3 satellites.

You should be as far away as possible from ANY structure/building/house. Middle of the garden is fine....or a big open field.

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  • 1 year later...

Hi! We have just moved to Botswana and have beautiful clear skies in wide open spaces and I would really like to learn the basics of the stars, planets etc along with my young kids. We really have no astronomy experience at all so would you suggest that the Sky Scout is a good starting tool :)? Would really appreciate the input.

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Bots, i can't help feeling that a smartphone with Google Sky Map would be better for a beginner. It shows you on screen what you are looking at, and then you can phone your mates to tell them what you've found!

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