Jump to content

Stargazers Lounge Uses Cookies

Like most websites, SGL uses cookies in order to deliver a secure, personalised service, to provide social media functions and to analyse our traffic. Continued use of SGL indicates your acceptance of our cookie policy.

sgl_imaging_challenge_banner_solar_25.thumb.jpg.f1d5d01d306644f613efd90ef96b314c.jpg

Doc

Craters Armstrong, Collins & Aldrin.

Recommended Posts

Just wondering if any of you have viewed the following on the moon.

Armstrong, Collins and Aldrin Craters.

Armstrong is easy, as was Collins once I managed to see it with averted vision, but Aldrin I think I might have failed.

Anyone seen it and in what scope.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, i've seen them with the 8"SCT. Under average seeing, Armstrong was always pretty easy and Aldrin was do-able in moments of better seeing. But Collins was a problem child and hid from view till one night when the seeing was better than average. I verified it four times and then whooped so loud all the local dogs started howling. :mad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I feel sorry for MC. He didn't get to tread on the moon, although his job was evey bit as Important, then the crater that bears his name is a bit obscure. I wonder how he feels about it.:mad:

Ron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For one hour last night I struggled with Aldrin and you two both say that this crater is easier then Collins. IMO Collins was easy once spotted but Aldrin was very hard and thats with 16" of aperture, so Carol hats of to you to spot this with 8".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The craters bearing their names used to be called Sabine.

Armstrong got E, Aldrin B, and Collins D.

Info. from the Virtual Moon Atlas.

Doesn't help much Mick:D.

Ron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ali, i was using 222x which was my normal lunar magnification with the SCT. It's a 9mm orthoscopic eyepiece with very nice contrast.

Mick, maybe libration played a part? These craters are nearly on the lunar equator and really get tossed to and fro, changing the angle of the sunlight on them. I actually had a more difficult time verifying Aldrin's location than i did seeing it. There's a little wrinkle ridge nearby that helped guide me, though.

Ron, i saw an interview where Mike was asked about staying in orbit while Neil and Buzz got to walk on the surface and he honestly wasn't bothered by it, you could tell by the tone of his voice and his relaxed body language. Overall, he seemed to be the most laid-back of the three, so i'd guess that having an obscure crater named after him wouldn't bother him a bit either (heck, i'd be happy to have a footprint named after me :mad: ).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
(heck, i'd be happy to have a footprint named after me :mad: ).

But don't you have not one, but two stars in Ursa Major named after you:D?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hi Ali, i was using 222x which was my normal lunar magnification with the SCT. It's a 9mm orthoscopic eyepiece with very nice contrast.

Mick, maybe libration played a part? These craters are nearly on the lunar equator and really get tossed to and fro, changing the angle of the sunlight on them. I actually had a more difficult time verifying Aldrin's location than i did seeing it. There's a little wrinkle ridge nearby that helped guide me, though.

Ron, i saw an interview where Mike was asked about staying in orbit while Neil and Buzz got to walk on the surface and he honestly wasn't bothered by it, you could tell by the tone of his voice and his relaxed body language. Overall, he seemed to be the most laid-back of the three, so i'd guess that having an obscure crater named after him wouldn't bother him a bit either (heck, i'd be happy to have a footprint named after me :D ).

HehHeh!, Of course you are right in what you say Carol.

I was merely substituting my own thoughts on top of those of Michael Collins. Besides, he had the best views of that "Magnificent Desolation":mad:

Ron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
But don't you have not one, but two stars in Ursa Major named after you:D?

You're right, there are two of me up there. :mad:

Kappa's probably my parallel universe twin. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Collins was the 1st man to be truly alone when the farside of the moon

except for Adam I suppose

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here's a webcam image of the three craters I took some years ago.

X Marks the Apollo 11 landing site.

S5 is the Surveyor 5 landing site, although it was too far away for them to get to it.

The two larger craters Sabine and Ritter lead the way, so start with them first.

Dave

post-14922-133877465968_thumb.jpg

Edited by Dave

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave thats really useful. I saw a glimpse of the crater seperating Collins ans Aldrin, but Aldrin eluded me, but not next time :mad:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mick

Good luck with this. I really must try this myself.

Cheers

Ian

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I observed them last night with my new 4" f/9 ED Skywatcher Evostar refractor through a thin haze and not so good local seeing (the Moon was above the house of our neighbours):

- At 100x (9 mm Burgess/TMB planetary) Armstrong was easy, but the others were not visible

- at 150x (6 mm Burgess/TMB planetary) Collins is visible at moments of good seeing

- at 180x (5 mm Plossl): Collins continuous visible, Aldrin glimpsed at moments of good seeing

Edited by Variablestar

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well done variablestar quite impressive with a 4" scope. I have since seen them a few times, as Carol said I think libration played a big part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A belated pic from tonight under poor seeing but trio just recorded:hello2:

post-33671-133877780549_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
A belated pic from tonight under poor seeing but trio just recorded:hello2:

Nice one! :(

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Dave - better seeing earlier last night for enlarged crop of Apollo 11 site [top left] and Apollo 15 site [first buggy on moon!] nr Hadley Rille and Mt:hello2:

post-33671-133877781735_thumb.jpg

post-33671-133877781739_thumb.jpg

post-33671-133877781743_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Riding home from the pub at 10pm after a MTB night ride I decide that with the waning Moon out on a really lovely night I would get the scope out and have another look for this three craters. Even with the terminator now going through the Sea of Tranquility, and some really great lunar features standing out, I still could not see them. At times I think I saw one of them, but wonder whether that is a mirage. They are not easy to spot and I am beginning to wonder whether my scope or (more likely) my eyes are up to finding them. The search continues...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.