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Meteorite hits cricket fan


richbyers
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I drove past Uxbridge CCC ground on the day this happened, it'd be interesting to see if our local gazette newspaper has anything on the story. I will scan and post the story on here if they do :mad:

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Surely they would have noticed a fireball in the sky not just a dark mass and one side of that thing looks as smooth as a babies bum. Its probably a mass of built up dirt come loose from a plane or something.

That or they use some unusual ball tampering techniques in Sussex......

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Pebble-sized meteorites are supposed to "sort-land"? My recollection of miss-fielding a catch "in the deep" is that, it (a) hurts, and (:D is very embarrassing! I wouldn't fancy being hit by that... half-brick - anywhere, at any velocity though? :mad:

Edited by Macavity
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Knowing how thorough the rules governing cricket are, I'm sure there will be a section to cover a meteorite interrupting play. It's probably a dead ball.

Given that it doesn't appear to have been very hot, could there be another freaky explanation like it having fallen from the undercarriage of a plane ...Uxbridge isn't a million miles from Heathrow.

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Although it might sound counter-intuitive, i think the general consensus is that landing meteorites will not be hot, or at least not very hot - maybe warm.

But I don't think there is much in the way of real evidence, and what there is, is a bit anecdotal.

But remember, the meteorite has been travelling in the icy blackness of space, and will be very cold. Then its the surface that is ablated away as it penetrates the atmosphere, and the ablation process will remove much of the heat of entry.

For the final descent, not much heat will be added.

So, it seems likely it would not be very hot, possibly warm, or possibly cold.

/callump

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Exactly. The heat shield gets really hot, but loses its heat by the material ablating away. Inside the ship its quite cool, at least not hot enough to fry the astronauts.

Also, I don't remember any big puffs of steam as the capsules hit the water...

/callump

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I just had another look at the article and photo and am now wondering about the flat surface. Looks like it could be a fragment from an engineering brick. :mad:

That apart, the terminal temperature, (I'm guessing) would be determined more by the composition of the meteorite than its passing through the atmosphere. It looks blackish in colour so might have a high carbon content which gives up heat fairly quickly. It's quite small so could have been picked up by the jet stream and carried some way, giving it time to cool.

Meteorite bouncing from deep space into the boundary for six sounds much better than surly youff lobbing half brick at Pimms drinkers. :D

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The picture is not of the meteorite which fell, it's a stock photo. The real picture can be found elsewhere.

So how did they see it hurtling toward them? Were they looking up for the six Panesar just hit? (j/k)

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i've got a vision of a fielder trying to catch a lofted ball, getting confused and catching a meteorite that burns a hole straight through his hands :mad:

(too much time watching cartoons as a kid i think)

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i've got a vision of a fielder trying to catch a lofted ball, getting confused and catching a meteorite that burns a hole straight through his hands :mad:

(too much time watching cartoons as a kid i think)

Maybe not that, but there's a long-standing story of a delivery from a fast bowler killing a sparrow, at Lord's. The wicketkeeper, apparently, took the sparrow cleanly in his gloves and let the ball past for four byes. The sparrow was later stuffed and kept as an exhibit.

Not quite so exotic as a meteorite though... if this thing was a meteorite...

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