Jump to content

 

1825338873_SNRPN2021banner.jpg.68bf12c7791f26559c66cf7bce79fe3d.jpg

 

Brand new and in need of advice


astroman_79
 Share

Recommended Posts

iv always been interested in astronomey but never got into it. iv decided now is the time to buy a telescope and go for it. its now or never.

how much should i pay? what do i need to know?

im gonna get some books out of the libary anybody recommend anything?

cheers

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • Replies 26
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

A reasonable starter scope that isn't a toy will cost in the region of £130 to £180 brand new or round £100 to £130 second hand (maybe a spot less if you're good at negotiation).

The sort I'd be thinking of is a basic Skywatcher 130P on an EQ mount or maybe a 150P on a Dobsonian mount like these:

http://www.opticalvision.co.uk/documents/85.pdf or

Dobsonians - Skywatcher Skyliner 150P Dobsonian

These are both reflectors and though at the cheaper end will givevery reasonable views of most everything (planets, nebulae, clusters etc) and flexibility for upgrade.

The best advice I usually give is to set a budget and buy the largest aperture within that, leaving a little left over for a collimator, a good book like "Turn Left at Orion" and maybe an extra eyepiece or barlow lens.

Extra's like tracking motors and goto can be left for later upgrades once you're happy you want to stick with the hobby.

Also get Stellarium - which is a free downloadable planetarium software that will help find your way around the sky.

Hope that helps - welcome to the group and hope you enjoy the hobby :eek:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi from me too - :eek: Be wary of cheap ebay scopes and also scopes from high street type shops.

£100 would get you a pretty decent 2nd hand TAL 1 - be careful though with older ones. A new scope at that price would be quite limiting.

If its any help I have a sort of primer online here So you want to buy a telescope ? - Part 1 which might at least give you some very basic intro type stuff and help you.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hmm - scopes generally sell 2nd hand for about 60% of their as new price but obviously a lot depends on the scopes condition and the make. Its a bit like cars really. The big brands are Skywatcher, Meade and Celestron - theres are lots of others but those three probably sell the most scopes and will most likley have products that 2nd hand would fit in your budget.

To give you an example the very popular Skywatcher 130PM used to sell for about £179 - 2nd hand they turn up quite often at around £100. My own one sold for about £90 but I was in a hurry. Thats a good beginner scope and its sold in loads of different versions.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there and welcome to the forum.

Joining an astronomical club/society is a good idea. Some clubs hold observation evenings that help give beginners an idea of what you are likely to see with different types of equipment. Many clubs actively lend out equipment for a small fee which is useful if the budget proves difficult and of course being part of a club puts you in contact with people who can provide hints and tips on how to locate some of those great objects.

Buying used gear is a good way to get started. Please come back to the forum if you see something you like but are not sure if the price is fair or if the equipment has any hidden costs, its always better to check before writing the cheque!

Clear skies to you on your quest and look forward to hearing how you get on.

James

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Astroman,

A very warm welcome to SGL, when you visit your library try and obtain a copy of the Backyard Astronomers Guide, Dickinson and dyer, also Night Watch, Terence Dickinson, and if you are going to have a go with binos, as starters, you will not go far wrong with a copy of Turn Left at Orion, Bro Guy Consolmagno and M.Davis although this is essentially for telescopes with smaller apertures, it is widely recommended, Sky and Telescopes Pocket Sky Atlas, Roger Sinnott, will help you find your way about the sky, enjoy the forum.

John.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Astroman,

Welcome to SGL.

I would echo the advice that's already been posted. See if you can get to have a look at some scopes before you decide what to buy, Astro societies are usually helpful, or see if you can get to a star party, where most types of scope will be in use. The owners are usually obliging and will tell you the pro's and con's of what they have, and maybe will give you a look. (Don't forget to take some Jaffa cakes!)

Don't go by magnification, go by the size of aperture, it's the light you gather that's important. The greater the aperture the more light you can get to the eyepiece or ccd, and the fainter the object you will be able to see.

Good hunting.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Astroman and welcome to the forum. I'm not going to repeat the excellent advice you have been given above, but from my limited experience to date, I think whatever level you start at with both scope and eyepieces, it won't be long before you are looking to upgrade. Enjoy and ask whatever questions you like, there is always someone who can help.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welcome to SGL. I'd suggest looking at a free sky map program like Stellarium. Most of the enjoyment comes in knowing what you are looking at.

An observer with a small scope who actually knows something about the stars they are observing will get MUCH more enjoyment than someone who has splashed out big money to look at "boring points of light"

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.