Jump to content

sgl_imaging_challenge_2021_annual.thumb.jpg.3fc34f695a81b16210333189a3162ac7.jpg

Building a 10" f/4,5 airline Dobsonian


Roel
 Share

Recommended Posts

I am currently rebuilding my 10" truss Dob into a suitcase-type scope that can be transported as hand luggage on an airplane. Everything but the trusses fits inside a wooden case of 14" x 14" x 8". The case itself serves as the bottom plate + rockerbox. The trusses are simple L-shaped aluminum rods that can be transported in one D=40mm PVC tube that will easily fit between the normal luggage (in a big suitcase)

I've just finished the painting, and I will upload more pictures soon.

More pictures of building the scope can be found here:

Zelfbouw: 254mm f/4,5 kofferdobson (UPDATE 4-6-’10) Roelblog

post-20258-133877462377_thumb.jpg

post-20258-13387746238_thumb.jpg

post-20258-133877462384_thumb.jpg

Edited by Roel
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Actually, the "other" Dutch ATM (I guess you mean Sumerian) is a friend of mine. I don't know which one of us caught the virus first, but one thing is for sure: building truss Dobs is VERY addictive. A 12" is being designed as we speak...

As promised, a few photo's of the painted, almost finished telecope:

post-20258-133877462594_thumb.jpg

post-20258-133877462598_thumb.jpg

post-20258-133877462603_thumb.jpg

post-20258-133877462605_thumb.jpg

Edited by Roel
Link to comment
Share on other sites

A Thing of Beauty indeed! Do you have the plans for this?

While I am pretty hopeless with wood, I do have an uncle to teaches woodwork and a 10" f4.8 dob that's not being used much. f4.8 vs f4.5 - could I copy directly or would I need to vary the distance on the struts considerably?

Cheers,

Karl.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just get a great feeling when I see structures made of wood.

Of course the Aluminium Struts are complimentary as well as desirable. A wooden mirror is impossible :D.

Congratulations on a superb build.

If you also ground and polished & figured the mirror, then it is a supreme acheivement.

Ron.:)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Do you have the plans for this?

I never work with plans. I always start with the most inner part of the final package: the secondary cage. Then I make the other parts to fit around it. It's always a bit of a suprise how big the final package will be exactly!

how do you make the round / curved bits? How do you make sure they are exactly the right curvature?

My woodworking skills are limited to a table saw for the straight cuts and a jig saw for the round parts. I once tried a router but that was no succes...

If you also ground and polished & figured the mirror...

If I only got the patience... :)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never work with plans. I always start with the most inner part of the final package: the secondary cage. Then I make the other parts to fit around it. It's always a bit of a suprise how big the final package will be exactly!

My woodworking skills are limited to a table saw for the straight cuts and a jig saw for the round parts. I once tried a router but that was no succes...

If I only got the patience... :)

Oh, I'm sure you have Roel, it's finding the time maybe.:D

It's great though, when your astronomy has a strong hands on element to it. What you've done is very nice indeed.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Oh, by the way. This is not the first truss-kit I built for this mirror set. I use to have a smaller, lighter version of this scope but because a 300mm f/4 mirror set is on its way, the 250mm telescope will be redundant soon.

Although it was light and small, it was not really strong. It had also a lot of loose parts that made it a bit awkward to set up. So I built this more rigid version that would be more suitable to be sold. It got first light just yesterday and it works fine. So bye bye 250mm, hello 300mm! (Can't wait for the mirrors to arrive!)

This is a picture of the previous version, on a trip to La Palma. You can see that especially the secondary cage was pretty delicate.

post-20258-133877463043_thumb.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

the work of both of you guys is just fabulous. well done indeed. not only brilliantly designed but also beautiful to look at and very functional with every possible corner cut to reduce weight/size; albeit without losing the strength needed to do the job. quite awe inspiring.

this is probably a stupid question but where do you put the struts? presumably in your suitcase?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.