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Deneb

M11 - The Wild Duck Cluster *Unguided*

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Hi

I took this shot of M11 - The Wild Duck Cluster, situated in Scutum.

Actually it was just meant to be some test shots from a few nights ago, I was so impressed with them, so I share it with you lot... Definitly a object I would want to return to.. even in the murk.

Taken with 16x 2mins Subs @ISO800, 10x Flats & 10x Bias..

Nadeem..

Edited by Deneb

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That's a staggering starfield. but I always wonder where the wild duck is... I can't see why we call it that...

Olly

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Very nicely resolved, (as usual). Pretty good for about half an ours worth.

I agree with the others, I dont see the duck either.

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Great shot of a rich area. Name comes from looking like a flight of ducks distured on a pond, not very good name really.

John.

Edited by johnh

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Superb pics of M11 Nadeem. I love this cluster, it sits in a very rich area in Scutum, and it is one of my favourite objects.

It isn't often imaged I've noticed, probably because of it's low declination, but it is a lovely sight visually.

The cluster was discovered by a German Observer, Gottfried Kirch.

It's appearance is supposed to resemble a flight of wild Ducks, a description given by an Admiral Smyth.

Ron.:D

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The following is an extract from the Internet.

"William Henry Smyth, an admiral in the British navy, was of American descent. After his retirement in 1825 Smyth erected an observatory in Bedford, England. The principal instrument was a 5.9" refractor by Tully which was carried on an equatorial mount similar to the ones later used on the 28" refractor at Greenwich and the 100" Hooker telescope."

Edited by barkis

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Super shot.

I can confirm that it does resemble the shape of a duck in flight through a medium sized reflector, that's for sure. :D

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Nadeem, great shot, love the detail. Riklaunim, you are a fool, I was busy looking at that 'nebulosity' for real, some of us are easily had :D

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