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June 23rd, 742nm image


Starman
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I finally got properly set-up for Jupiter but appear to be a bit close to a rather large privet hedge which ended up dripping on me for most of this session! A bit of an adjustment to position tomorrow morning I think!

Here's my first processed image from this morning's run, an IR742 filtered result. The rest of the captures will have to wait until I've had some sleep.

2010-06-23_03-12-08_742.jpg

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WOW Pete! amazed at the detail for such a close shot! Nicely done!

Would you mind explaining to me what and why the IR742..im guessing its Infra-red but i dont know why you would use it?

Thanks,

Michael

Edited by msinclairinork
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Thanks chaps :rolleyes:

Yes Michael, the 742 is an IR pass filter. As the wavelength gets longer the seeing tends to get steadier so using a filter like this can help get you a less atmospherically disturbed result. It also delivers excellent contrast, especially on Jupiter. The down side is that the light levels coming through the filter drop significantly compared to normal RGB (although B is quite low anyway) meaning that you'll typically need to drop the frame rate to obtain a decent signal level.

Here's my first colour result from this morning's run, presented closer to the actual capture size.

2010-06-23_03-08-32_IR-RGB.jpg

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Lovely work Pete, super images.

And even better, i made the effort this morning and saw that visually myself. I can see the festoon above the shadow which was quite apparent visually. Excellent stuff.

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Yes, a C8 should be able to deliver some great shots of Jupiter. It's slightly larger brother, the C9.25 is still considered to be one of the best planetary scopes.

If you're getting blurred images above f/10, have you checked the scope's collimation and are you allowing it sufficient time to cool down? Ideally, you'd need to leave it outside for at least 2 hours prior to taking any images.

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804 is the darker one, and 742 is designed from 5-6" aperture. It works nicely on bright targets like moon, Mars or Jupiter, needs more light on Saturn. It's all about focal ratio. IMHO the main problem I have is seeing. Yesterday I made some moon images but every frame had different shape and size od craters. Summer and low targets just over concrete buildings - that won't work for me.

Emil on the other hand can do excellent images in daylight. Open ground, astro chickens and no city around helps :rolleyes:

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Amazing early shot Pete, so much detail here, Every year you seem to have some that dont go well for you, then WHAM a huge jump in quality and resolution. This is no exception. Just top class this early. I tried at a similar power but the seeing although not the pits, just wasnt really up to it, I think shooting over my neighbours hot summer roof might be killing it. Will probably have to wait untill it gets between the houses due south for any real quality

Nice one Pete

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Thanks Stuart.

BTW the colour image was incorrectly dated as the 22nd when it should have been the 23rd. This has now been corrected as well as the original colour image having now been replaced by a later processed version.

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