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Refractor nut dithers...


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I'm one of those poor souls who will pay what it takes to buy a refractor. I drive a Fiat Panda but I look, or image, through a couple of Ferraris. (TEC 140 and Takahashi FSQ.) However, I have an interesting scope on the way, for test purposes; Altair Astro's imaging Newtonian. It is not a refractor but one box it does tick, big time. F4. As an imager I know that f4 is good. The Baby Q with reducer runs at f3.9 and is imaging heaven.

So I will keep you posted. This looks like being very interesting because, for a similar focal length to our TEC 140 at thousands of dollars (I don't want to get myself certified by telling you how many!) this scope rolls in at under £500.

It is always as well to challenge your own prejudices, eh? We'll see...

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
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Good luck Olly, not sure that's dithering or slip sliding :D

I know, I know... but I will try to remain, as one of my Belgian friends laughingly calls me, 'Honest Olly.' (I don't know why he thinks it's so funny...)

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
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I know, I know... but I will try to remain, as one of my Belgian friends laughingly calls me, 'Honest Olly.' (I don't know why he thinks it's so funny...)

Olly

It sounds like you'll enjoy it any which way, and that's all that really matters :D

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Ahhh but all the REAL telescopes are reflectors :D

Besides us Newt fans always have something to do when its cloudy - you can always get that collimation just a little bit sweeter :D

Hope the new scope works out for you though.

Edited by Astro_Baby
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I'm only going to be a temporary member for the duration of the test! However, I did read a comparison of a similar (but not identical) 2000/800 Newt and TEC140 on the web. I can do a similar comparison here, I guess.

Mike's current POW has certainly set me thinking, though. Trouble is, a big Newt really is big when it's not a Dob.

As for collimation, I do it all the time on our twenty inch but only for visual use. I wonder how I should deal with it for imaging? Laser then star test? Or is there some demon way of doing it via the CCD image and possibly software? EG measuring the roundness of the stellar image?

Olly

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