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Good Scope for DSO


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Ive got a good grap and go scope for planets etc, can anyone recommend a good scope for DSO. dont really fancy a dob i just not that keen on them. WOuld a 6" refractor be any good?

Ive got a budget of about £600ish for it.

Thanks

Steve

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For DSOs try and go for the largest apateure that you can afford at the time. Maybe something like a SW 200P on an EQ5 would fit the bill, it's well under budget at £369? For around £700 you can buy the exact same scope but with a GO-TO mount included.

Reflectors - Skywatcher Explorer 200P EQ5

Reflectors - Skywatcher Explorer 200P EQ5 GOTO

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It's aperture in visual observing. Also, though, it's focal length; too long and you can't get the wide fields needed. You can pick up second hand skywatcher (clone) 6 inch refractors for very little, the short tube ones not being optically as good as the longer ones. I have a rarely used 150 'Helios' achromat which is quite a mean performer in truth. But as the others have said, bang for your buck in visual use has to be a Newt.

Olly

Edited by ollypenrice
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I think the Explorer 200P is portable enough that they appear down our dark site everytime we have a session, so people aren't struggling to carry them and get them in and out of cars.

Or perhaps that is why they are all clenching their teeth!!!

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I own a 6" F/8 refractor and a 10" F/4.8 newtonian and the newtonian would be my first choice for DSO's every time. The refractor is great for planets, lunar and double stars.

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A six inch refractor is an unwieldly beast, the tube is about 50 inches long and generally over 20lbs in weight. The 8 inch newt is much easier to handle and mount onto the eq head and the greater magnification will bring more objects into view.

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For seeing faint DSO's you really need aperture and as little glass as possible. The 8" SCT has four lenses/reflective surfaces before the light enters the ep a Newtonian reflector has just two. Also the reflectors offer larger FOV's when compared with the SCT's. You might not like them but DOB's are the way to go and you can learn to love them just like sprouts.

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Heh heh...I knew this thread would go down the dob route...:D

Seriously though Steve, it is the way to go. If you get a dob, you'll have everything covered, especially with owning the ETX as well.

An 8" would be great - It'll leave you a bit of spare cash for some decent eyepieces. The 10" is even better for obvious reasons. :D

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Yes, i think you will have to embrace the dob if you want aperture in as easy to use form.

The other route is the one John took with his OO 10" and that's buy a Giro mount. But at the end of the day, when all is said and done, that too is only a dob but with a tripod.

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They are very stable, very easy to setup and very easy to use.....all compared to an EQ. But like a dob, they don't track. However, for DSO hunting its all about lower powers, bigger fields and flying around the sky. I find an EQ a hindrance.

Edited by russ
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hmmmm might have to consider a dob then any suggestions for ultra portable ones 8-10"

I have an 8inch SCT and love it.

With a 2inch diagonal and 2inch 32mm or so EP (both still on my wish list hehe) you should be able to get quite a Wide FoV.

A 6.3 focal reducer is also on my wish list. Wich will increase your FoV even more (especially for DSO photography I'm planning to do with it) :D

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They are very stable, very easy to setup and very easy to use.....all compared to an EQ. But like a dob, they don't track. However, for DSO hunting its all about lower powers, bigger fields and flying around the sky. I find an EQ a hindrance.

Russ has highlighted the main benefits of the Giro-type mount but I'd also add:

- Puts the eyepiece at a slightly higher viewing position than the conventional dob mount (at least my setup does) which for someone who prefers to stand when observing and has back troubles occasionally, is great :D

- Versatile - you can put virtually any scope up to 20lbs in weight on a Giro-type mount and put one on the other side as well which is fun when you want to compare views. When I want to use my 6" F/8 refractor the mount needs a taller tripod of course.

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Picking up on what John and Jero have said, you could also consider an SCT on a Giro. An 8" SCT with 0.63 reducer and a Hyperion 24mm will give a true FOV of 1.3deg. This is the way i went with my SCT, you get a larger true field with the reducer and 24mm 68deg 1.25" eyepiece than you do with the 32mm 72deg 2" eyepiece.

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