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OXO

Whats your Top Ten Dso's inc Clusters

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Hi Steve,

Everything on that list i've seen from the backgarden with the Explorer 200. But they certainly looked better in the 10" LX200. But all looked impressive in the 8" Newt from the New Forest under dark skies.

I've imaged them all except the Leo galaxies (65, 66, 95, 96). M101 was a [removed word] from the back garden. NGC7331 a nightmare to find, actually no problem finding, just a nightmare to see. But again no worries from a dark site.

Be interesting to see how the C8 fares compared to the Explorer.

Russ

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Well as u all know i love the NEBS I THINK MINE WOULD BE

B33 H/HEAD

The flame nebula

Eagle nebula

Triffid Nebula

Orion NEBULA

Rosette Nebula

M51

M100

Jelly fish Nebula

Monkey Nebula

Cheers

Rog

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... it was a wind-up Rog ... wasn't it ...?  Please tell me it was a wind-up :)

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No wind up Steve see Rog's images he has just posted! Cant say as i have seen them myself before but i do remember trying lol..

James :)

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No wind up Steve see Rog's images he has just posted! Cant say as i have seen them myself before but i do remember trying lol..

James :)

:oops: :shaking: :) :book: :)

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The Perseus Double Cluster :shock: Thats an amazing sight in any Telescope/Binos Andy i would reccomend you take a look next time out!

On my first night out with a telescope, the double cluster was one of the first DSO I viewed and it clean took my breath away.  I still, whenever possible, search it out.  Under a clear sky - and thru an aperture around 8" or greater - you can make out a couple of warm stars between the two clusters and perhaps 2-3 more in the lower cluster.  For my money, it has the Pleiades beat. 

Steve :)

Found this image of the Double Cluster today:

image.jpg

http://tinyurl.com/7swoe

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CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

CRAB NEBULA!

ORION GAS NEBULA!

and yeah, i really like the crab nebula.

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So M51 is you fav then adrius :shock:

The crab nebula cant say as i have got a good look at it for a long long time..

James :)

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It was worth a look when I had my 12" Dob, I'll give it a go in the 10" ASAP.

The best thing (for me) about M1 is knowing what it is and that Chinese astronomers recorded the event all those years ago.

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The best thing (for me) about M1 is knowing what it is and that Chinese astronomers recorded the event all those years ago.
Yes it is quite amazing to think about that Gaz lucky buggers!

James :)

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You should have seen the image that Dave (admin UKAI) managed to get of the crab nebula with a SC1 Toucam. It was a few years ago so unlikely to still be there but my god it was good - it was one of those images that really got me interested in getting a SC1 and seeing what I could do.

Ant

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For Info:

The Crab Nebula is the most famous and conspicuous known supernova remnant, the expanding cloud of gas created in the explosion of a star as supernova which was observed in the year 1054 AD.

The supernova was noted on July 4, 1054 A.D. by Chinese astronomers as a new or "guest star," and was about four times brighter than Venus, or about mag -6. According to the records, it was visible in daylight for 23 days, and 653 days to the naked eye in the night sky. It was probably also recorded by Anasazi Indian artists (in present-day Arizona and New Mexico), as findings in Navaho Canyon and White Mesa (both Arizona) as well as in the Chaco Canyon National Park (New Mexico) indicate; there's a review of the research on the Chaco Canyon Anasazi art online. In addition, Ralph R. Robbins of the University of Texas has found Mimbres Indian art from New Mexico, possibly depicting the supernova.

More info from Seds

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ooooooooooooo!!!

That's a nice one 8)

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The view with my 12" Dob was not quite as contrasty as that Steve.... :)

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I had the pleasure of hearing a talk on M1 by Dr. Chip Megan, while in Hunstville, Alabama. He opened it by saying, "The crab nebula is the result of a supernova explosion recorded by the Chinese in 1054 ad. There' has been on average, one paper per year submitted on this object since then." That means 951 papers! If you can't find info on the Crab, you're just not trying. :) It is clearly the single most observed and studied object on the sky, being studied in every wavelength from microwave to gamma rays. It's used as a standard candle for just about everything and is usually the first object imaged by new satellites of every wavelength for calibration. Truly, a wonderful object. 8)

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Blimey, about time I observed it then :oops: :) :)

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Steve, Astroman may be forgetting we don't all share his dark skies!! :)

It's pretty diffuse and only 'easy' to find from an average site with an average scope in the UK because it is so near an easy to find star, wait for a dark night with good seeing and point preferably 8" or more of glass at it. I've seen it many times and IMHO, like M31, there is no substitute for having unpolutted skies (and large aperture) when viewing M1.

Gaz

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You say that Russ, but you must remember Dave's M1? He took it with a 8" Newt, SC1 Toucam and by his own admission his skies are not the best!

Ant

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