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Whats your Top Ten Dso's inc Clusters

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Hi Pop pickers it's Top Ten Time! :)

So whats your favorite top ten Dso's inc Star clusters? this can be one's you have either imaged,observed or seen in book's/Mags etc etc.

Here's my list,

1.M13 (The great Hercules cluster)

2.M57 (The ring nebula)

3.M27 (The dumbell nebula)

4.M31 ( Andromeda galaxy)

5.M42 (Orion Nebula)

6.M81 (Bodes Galaxy)

7.NGC 7000 (North American Nebula)

8.M51 (Whirlpool Galaxy)

9.M16 (Eagle Nebula)

10.NGC 869/ 884 (Perseus Double Cluster)

I imagine this will change as i get more and more into Dso's over time but for now thats my list :)

James

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I think many of my favourites are in your top 10 James. They are:

1. M17 The Swan

2. M27 The Dumbell

3. M42 The Orion

4. NGC2244 The Rosette

5. M16 The Eagle

6. M13 The Great Globular

6. M57 The Ring

7. M45 The Pleiades

8. M64 The Blackeye

9. M51 The Whirlpool

10. NGC6995 The Veil nebula

I've probably left a few out which may rank higher - but there ya go!

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I am not as experienced as you James so would struggle to list ten. 

Here are my favourites:

1. M13 (The great Hercules cluster)

2. M57 (The ring nebula)

3. M42 (Orion Nebula)

4. NGC 869/ 884 (Perseus Double Cluster)

5. M11 (Wild Duck Cluster)

6. Albireo (Double Star)

7. NGC6992/6960 (Veil Nebula East and West)

I am cheating when I list number 7 as I havent actually viewed either but they do fascinate me and I intend viewing them at the next oppurtunity.  With several of the above being in or around Cygnus ... that must be my current favourite constellation. 

Steve :)

PS: Any tips for viwing the Veil Nebulas?

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The veil nebula ah yes thats a Hard one unless you have Dark Skies but it can be viewed without filters. But for the best views your gonna be looking at a Filter something like H-alpha filter which will greatly enhance your observing of this wonderfull nebula. Also if you can use as low a Magnification as you can i find with my Scopes the ST102 is best because of the wide FOV i have with it. I am sure others will chip in with there experiences and tip's Steve :)

James :)

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I have viewed the eastern part of the Veil from a light polluted site, Steve. If the night is slightly misty or murky, forget it. You need one of those nights when the sky is clear & transparent & the Veil is riding high. It is a large DSO & will probably take up several fields of view - but you will see some nice filamentary detail there.

James, I can understand how the deep red Halpha filter would help for imaging purposes, but it would just block off far too much light to be useful at the eyepiece. The filter I've found useful is an Orion narrowband filter. However you still need the excellent transparency in the first place to make the object visible.

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A Narrowband filter would better esp if you cant get to a really dark site away from streetlights and such. I have viewed it with a pair of 10x50 bino's in the past and was prob the best view i have ever had..

James :)

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I suppose we should clarify what we mean by 'viewing'. Are we talking about traditional type viewing (which I was) where you just stick your eye to the eyepiece - or do we mean projecting an image onto a laptop (which I've never done)? I suppose for the latter means the Halpha may be very useful :)

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I suppose we should clarify what we mean by 'viewing'. Are we talking about traditional type viewing (which I was) where you just stick your eye to the eyepiece
I wondered why you wanted that Glue andy :).

James

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James, just looking at yours & Steve's lists there is one object on both that I don't think I've ever viewed. That is the Perseus Double Cluster. Isn't that shameful! :)

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The Perseus Double Cluster :shock: Thats an amazing sight in any Telescope/Binos Andy i would reccomend you take a look next time out!

James :shock: :)

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I suppose we should clarify what we mean by 'viewing'.

For me, it is simple 'eye to eyepiece' observation; nothing scientific. 

I doubt that I have the necessary time money or patience for astrophotography, though I do enjoy seeing the results posted here and plan to photograph the moon, milky way and a constellation or two myself ... sometime. 

Steve :)

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The Perseus Double Cluster :shock: Thats an amazing sight in any Telescope/Binos Andy i would reccomend you take a look next time out!

On my first night out with a telescope, the double cluster was one of the first DSO I viewed and it clean took my breath away.  I still, whenever possible, search it out.  Under a clear sky - and thru an aperture around 8" or greater - you can make out a couple of warm stars between the two clusters and perhaps 2-3 more in the lower cluster.  For my money, it has the Pleiades beat. 

Steve :)

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I'd be interested seeing (excuse pun) how others here 'view' their objects. I feel a new thread coming on. :)

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Perhaps it is too early on to call this a heads-up but I was playing with my StarryNight pc planaterium (sky too cloudy to be of any use!) and spotted Saturn passing the Beehive cluster late Jan thru early Feb next year. Something like a 32mm Plossl will show them both in the same F.O.V. :)

Steve :)

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That sounds a wonderfull sight Steve i may try to image it with a 2" eyepiece :shock:

Thanks for sharing..

James :)

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For me the list would depend on what sort of astronomy I was doing.

Visually it would consist of Open cluster / Globular Clusters and a few planetary nebula's.

But on the imaging side, M51 would be in there as would M42(not much to look at visually) M31...

So for me it greatly depends.

Ant

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Mine would be:

M81

M82

M65

M66

M51

M101

M31

M33

M95

M96

Ahh that was easy. Shame to miss out M77, NGC7331, M63 and few others.

Russ

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Are they all galaxies Russ? What about M51?

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M42(not much to look at visually)

Ant, I always think M42 is one of those objects, with the right sky, that's stunning visually and in a picture.

M31 is mighty dissappointing from the backgarden but stunning visually from a dark site.

I rarely bother with DSO's from the backgarden. That's the beauty of the Planets, they are still doable (is that a word) from almost anywhere.

Russ

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For god sake - someone must have edited the post! [removed word] no one has! I'll get my coat!

Certainly you can see a fair amount of detail on M42 visually, but for me it's not enough. I think that I need to spend more time at the EP of a scope and let my eye's fully dark adapt.

I spend so much of my time in looking at the laptop - and then once the scope/laptop is doing it's stuiff watching TV. My god I've lost the whole point of astronomy. Anyone want to buy a camera?

Ant

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I've certainly always found M31 a big let down from the city - even with an 11" scope. I get far more pleasure looking at smaller smudges in terms of galaxies such as M104, M64, M81/82 - and when it's really clear, M33. I've never found M31 really enjoyable to image either.

Yes, you need to let your eyes dark adapt to get the real beauty from M42 - i.e. the faint outer wisps. They are really beautiful to view.

M42's neighbour NGC2024 (the Flame) is one nebula that I've never been able to pick up, though I often read it shouldn't be too difficult. Either of you guys ever seen it visually?

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NGC2024 now thats a [removed word] to see i once seen it on my Laptop screen but never in the EP which is strange as i can quite cleary see most DSO's at the EP for example NGC7000...

Spending time at the EP certainly has it's rewards Ant try splitting some double stars to begin with then go onto DSO's the same observing session.

James

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Mine would be:

M81

M82

M65

M66

M51

M101

M31

M33

M95

M96

Ahh that was easy. Shame to miss out M77, NGC7331, M63 and few others.

Russ

All galaxies Russ; what are you using to view them, or are you imaging?

Steve :)

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