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Astronomy Books


Coco
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Seems like there's enough information around to almost not need to read a book.

If you have a book that's still worth picking up what is it?

Cheers

Guy

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Just bought Burnham's Celestail Handbook Vols 1-3 for the second time. The originals bought in the late 1970s disappeared during a messy divorce.

Feels like an old friend is back home :)

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Hi Coco,

Your right about all the available info that's at one's disposal but you really can't beat settling down and getting in to a good book. I am not a great user of the net and have spent a fair amount over the past couple of years on various astro books. I just prefer to look at the page than the monitor.

Turn Left at Orion (I see many people advocate this one)

Really enjoyable.

Alan

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I still have a soft spot for 'Atlas of the Planets' by Paul Doherty, (McGraw Hill 1980).

The book was published before CCD cameras or webcams were available to amateur astronomers, when the best way to record observations of the planets was to draw what was seen at the eyepiece. And Paul Doherty, (who used to be senior illustrator on The Sky At Night), sure could draw.

Lee.

Edited by StarMan1701
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